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Cutting Down Trees to Save Water in Cape Town

HOTTENTOTS HOLLAND MOUNTAINS NEAR CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA, JANUARY 30, 2024: A team from Likona Lethe Services - over 40 men and women strong - camp up on the mountain while they spend their days clearing the area of alien vegetation, in this case primarily pine trees. The Greater Cape Town Water Fund stimulates funding and implementation of catchment restoration efforts and, in the process, creates jobs and momentum to protect global biodiversity and build more resilient communities in the face of climate change. The Greater Cape Town Water Fund - a project of The Nature Conservancy - is cutting down thirsty non indigenous trees - mostly pines - over the Cape Mountains to save water and restore indigenous fynbos. The work was given an added impetus during the 2016-2019 water crisis which saw severe water rationing as Cape Town approached Day Zero - the day the taps would run dry. As of October 2023, GCTWF teams have cleared more than 46,000 hectares of invasive trees. This recovers about 15.2 billion liters of water per year (42 million liters per day) back into the water catchment and keeps the rivers flowing. CREDIT: Samantha Reinders for The Washington Post via Getty Images.
HOTTENTOTS HOLLAND MOUNTAINS NEAR CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA, JANUARY 30, 2024: A team from Likona Lethe Services - over 40 men and women strong - camp up on the mountain while they spend their days clearing the area of alien vegetation, in this case primarily pine trees. The Greater Cape Town Water Fund stimulates funding and implementation of catchment restoration efforts and, in the process, creates jobs and momentum to protect global biodiversity and build more resilient communities in the face of climate change. The Greater Cape Town Water Fund - a project of The Nature Conservancy - is cutting down thirsty non indigenous trees - mostly pines - over the Cape Mountains to save water and restore indigenous fynbos. The work was given an added impetus during the 2016-2019 water crisis which saw severe water rationing as Cape Town approached Day Zero - the day the taps would run dry. As of October 2023, GCTWF teams have cleared more than 46,000 hectares of invasive trees. This recovers about 15.2 billion liters of water per year (42 million liters per day) back into the water catchment and keeps the rivers flowing. CREDIT: Samantha Reinders for The Washington Post via Getty Images.
Cutting Down Trees to Save Water in Cape Town
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Credit:
The Washington Post / Contributor
Editorial #:
2033886382
Collection:
The Washington Post
Date created:
November 20, 2023
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Source:
The Washington Post
Object name:
safricatrees
Max file size:
3500 x 2333 px (11.67 x 7.78 in) - 300 dpi - 6 MB