The Bay Foundation (along with the city of Malibu and a few other partners) have been working on a project by Zuma/Point Dume to rebuild the sand dunes in that area.

MALIBU, CA - JANUARY 21: Sara Cuadra, watershed program coordinator with The Bay Foundation spreads seeds by hand of native plants on dunes near Zuma Lagoon as The Bay Foundation (along with the city of Malibu and a few other partners) have been working on a project by Zuma/Point Dume to rebuild the sand dunes in that area. On a January morning, scientists were setting up fencing and planting seeds in the sand seeds of native vegetation that used to grow in the sand, that naturally help trap sand and enables the dunes to build up (plant species include: native sand verbena, beach evening primrose, beach saltbush and beach bur ). They have been removing tons and tons of non-native plants that have pushed these native plants out (invasive species include ice plants, European sea rocket, Bermuda grass, myoporum and carnation spurge.) The goal is for these sand dunes to build up again, serve as a buffer from sea level rise, as well as a restored habitat for the birds and wildlife that used to call these ecosystems home. The Malibu dune restoration project is one of many that are starting to take form up and down the Southern California coast addressing a forgotten ecosystem. Westward Beach on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021 in Malibu, CA. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images).
MALIBU, CA - JANUARY 21: Sara Cuadra, watershed program coordinator with The Bay Foundation spreads seeds by hand of native plants on dunes near Zuma Lagoon as The Bay Foundation (along with the city of Malibu and a few other partners) have been working on a project by Zuma/Point Dume to rebuild the sand dunes in that area. On a January morning, scientists were setting up fencing and planting seeds in the sand seeds of native vegetation that used to grow in the sand, that naturally help trap sand and enables the dunes to build up (plant species include: native sand verbena, beach evening primrose, beach saltbush and beach bur ). They have been removing tons and tons of non-native plants that have pushed these native plants out (invasive species include ice plants, European sea rocket, Bermuda grass, myoporum and carnation spurge.) The goal is for these sand dunes to build up again, serve as a buffer from sea level rise, as well as a restored habitat for the birds and wildlife that used to call these ecosystems home. The Malibu dune restoration project is one of many that are starting to take form up and down the Southern California coast addressing a forgotten ecosystem. Westward Beach on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021 in Malibu, CA. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images).
The Bay Foundation (along with the city of Malibu and a few other partners) have been working on a project by Zuma/Point Dume to rebuild the sand dunes in that area.
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Credit:
Al Seib / Contributor
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1234406431
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Los Angeles Times
Date created:
January 21, 2021
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Los Angeles Times
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691575_ LA-ME-SAND-DUNES-SEA-LEVEL-RISE_15_ALS.jpg
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