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Inugguit villagers forced to move from Thule to Qaanaaq, Greenland may eventually be displaced because of climate change

QAANAAQ, GREENLAND - AUGUST 26, 2016 A man rows a small boat away from the tiny village of Qaanaaq, Greenland, where many people survive off of fishing and hunting, on August 26, 2016 by Whitney Shefte/The Washington Post via Getty Images. Qaanaaq is among the most northern inhabited places in the world, located inside the Arctic Circle, with a population of just over 600 people. The United States opened Thule Air Base in the early 1950s as a Cold War outpost to keep closer sight of operations by the U.S.S.R. In 1953, more than 100 Inugguit villagers were forced by the Danish government to leave their homes with only a few days notice, to make way for the base operations. Inugguit people live off the land by fishing and hunting seal, narwhal and walruses. But as the climate changes, their hunting seasons have changed, threatening their ability to survive. Now they are fishing more. Denmarks Prime Ministers office told the Washington post that while they cant be held responsible for the actions of a previous generation, the are sorry for the way in which the decision of relocation was made and implemented. They said the matter was legally closed nearly 20 years ago, after the government compensated the tribe for its displacement.
QAANAAQ, GREENLAND - AUGUST 26, 2016 A man rows a small boat away from the tiny village of Qaanaaq, Greenland, where many people survive off of fishing and hunting, on August 26, 2016 by Whitney Shefte/The Washington Post via Getty Images. Qaanaaq is among the most northern inhabited places in the world, located inside the Arctic Circle, with a population of just over 600 people. The United States opened Thule Air Base in the early 1950s as a Cold War outpost to keep closer sight of operations by the U.S.S.R. In 1953, more than 100 Inugguit villagers were forced by the Danish government to leave their homes with only a few days notice, to make way for the base operations. Inugguit people live off the land by fishing and hunting seal, narwhal and walruses. But as the climate changes, their hunting seasons have changed, threatening their ability to survive. Now they are fishing more. Denmarks Prime Ministers office told the Washington post that while they cant be held responsible for the actions of a previous generation, the are sorry for the way in which the decision of relocation was made and implemented. They said the matter was legally closed nearly 20 years ago, after the government compensated the tribe for its displacement.
Inugguit villagers forced to move from Thule to Qaanaaq, Greenland may eventually be displaced because of climate change
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Credit:
The Washington Post / Contributor
Editorial #:
675332208
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The Washington Post
Date created:
March 12, 2012
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The Washington Post
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