Create new Board
Editorial Images

How School Counselors Roles Have Evolved

BOSTON, MA - APRIL 24: Guidance Counselor Jacquelyn Indrisano embraces ninth-grader Arianna Troville, 16, outside her office at East Boston High School in Boston on April 24, 2019. The pair went on to have an unscheduled meeting where they talked about grades, friends and social media. As their guidance counselor, Indrisano is both school mother and enforcer to about 260 ninth-graders. She sees students pain and problems up close and doles out hugs and advice - and tough love when necessary. Indrisano intervenes to save teen friendships. She helps with issues at home. She even keeps bags filled with Dove soap bars, toothpaste, and shampoo to discreetly give to needy students. Indrisanos experience underscores the changed nature of guidance counseling at public high schools in Massachusetts and beyond. Once focused largely on helping students prepare for college and careers, counselors have seen their portfolios expand to encompass a host of new responsibilities for students social and emotional well-being. This shift - a response to students having more intense needs - has provided a valuable in-school resource, but at a significant cost: It has pushed college advising to the back burner, according to interviews with three dozen counselors, school officials, researchers, students, and lawmakers. (Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
How School Counselors Roles Have Evolved