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COSTA RICA-CLIMATE-CHANGE-COFFEE

Coffee producer Adrian Hernandez looks at a plant infested with the coffee-eating fungus roya, at his farm Altamira, in Barva Heredia, Heredia, 17 km north of San Jose, on August 25, 2015. Hernandez does not remember a year as dry as this one and says that only a rigorous management plan has allowed him to stay afloat. Coffee growers in Central America are having to adapt to global warming, including high temperatures and drought, as well as fighting the fungus known as roya, in order to keep in the business. The fungus, hemileia vastatrix, which began to spread in 2012 due to a lack of preventive measures and the effects of climate change, discolors and dries up coffee leaves, an effect that also gives roya the name of "leaf rust." AFP PHOTO / EZEQUIEL BECERRA (Photo credit should read EZEQUIEL BECERRA/AFP via Getty Images)
COSTA RICA-CLIMATE-CHANGE-COFFEE
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