Thailand, Umpang, close-up of elephant eye with tear : Stock Photo
Thailand, Umpang, close-up of elephant eye with tear : Stock Photo

Thailand, Umpang, close-up of elephant eye with tear

Credit: Palani Mohan
Creative #: sb10067666i-001
April 2002. A tear runs down the cheek of a three-year-old elephant during a three-day 'breaking in' ordeal carried out in the jungles of the Thai-Burma border by ethnic Karen people April 2002 in Umpang, Thailand. There are now less than 50,000 Asian elephants, both living in the wild and in captivity; a tiny number compared to their 600,000-strong African cousins. Some of the region's elephants still labour in jungle logging camps, alongside mahouts whose craft has been handed down through the generations. But with most nations having banned timber-felling, thousands of other beasts and their handlers have had to find another way to earn their living.

Details
License type: Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection: Photonica
Max file size: 4,854 x 3,469 px (16.18 x 11.56 in) - 300 dpi - 8.65 MB
Release info: Not releasedNot released: This imagery has no model or property release. Any commercial use requires additional clearance from third parties.

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Thailand Umpang Closeup Of Elephant Eye With Tear Stock Photo2002,Animal,Animal Body Part,Animal Eye,Animal Head,Animal Themes,Animal Welfare,Asian Elephant,Close-up,Crying,Day,Elephant,Elephant Calf,Horizontal,Looking Away,Mammal,No People,One Animal,Outdoors,Part Of,Selective Focus,Teardrop,Terrified,Thailand,Tired,Wrinkled,Young AnimalPhotographer Collection: Photonica April 2002. A tear runs down the cheek of a three-year-old elephant during a three-day 'breaking in' ordeal carried out in the jungles of the Thai-Burma border by ethnic Karen people April 2002 in Umpang, Thailand. There are now less than 50,000 Asian elephants, both living in the wild and in captivity; a tiny number compared to their 600,000-strong African cousins. Some of the region's elephants still labour in jungle logging camps, alongside mahouts whose craft has been handed down through the generations. But with most nations having banned timber-felling, thousands of other beasts and their handlers have had to find another way to earn their living.