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Stella 31. (Tormented Skies). Tikal. Guatemala : Stock Photo
Palacio de las Inscripciones. Tikal.Tikal was the capital of a conquest state that became one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya.[3] Though monumental architecture at the site dates back as far as the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 to 900 AD. During this time, the city dominated much of the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily, while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica such as the great metropolis of Teotihuacan in the distant Valley of Mexico. There is evidence that Tikal was conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century AD.[4] Following the end of the Late Classic Period, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the siteâ??s abandonment by the end of the 10th century.

Stella 31. (Tormented Skies). Tikal. Guatemala

Caption:
Palacio de las Inscripciones. Tikal.Tikal was the capital of a conquest state that became one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya.[3] Though monumental architecture at the site dates back as far as the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 to 900 AD. During this time, the city dominated much of the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily, while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica such as the great metropolis of Teotihuacan in the distant Valley of Mexico. There is evidence that Tikal was conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century AD.[4] Following the end of the Late Classic Period, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the siteâ??s abandonment by the end of the 10th century.
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Creative #:
155257960
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
Luis Castaneda Inc.
Collection:
The Image Bank
Max file size:
3,524 x 4,980 px (11.75 x 16.60 in) - 300 dpi - 17.6 MB
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Not released.More information

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Stella 31 Tikal Guatemala Stock Photo 155257960Tikal,Ancient,Architecture,Art And Craft,Built Structure,Carving,Color Image,Creativity,Day,El Peten,Engraving,Famous Place,Guatemala,Indoors,No People,Palace,Photography,Rock,Travel Destinations,VerticalPhotographer Collection: The Image Bank 2012©Luis CastañedaPalacio de las Inscripciones. Tikal.Tikal was the capital of a conquest state that became one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya.[3] Though monumental architecture at the site dates back as far as the 4th century BC, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, ca. 200 to 900 AD. During this time, the city dominated much of the Maya region politically, economically, and militarily, while interacting with areas throughout Mesoamerica such as the great metropolis of Teotihuacan in the distant Valley of Mexico. There is evidence that Tikal was conquered by Teotihuacan in the 4th century AD.[4] Following the end of the Late Classic Period, no new major monuments were built at Tikal and there is evidence that elite palaces were burned. These events were coupled with a gradual population decline, culminating with the siteâ??s abandonment by the end of the 10th century.