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Scanning electron micrograph of  asbestos, 1500x : Stock Photo
Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of at a magnification of 1500x showing some of the microcrystalline ultrastructure exhibited by a piece of raw chrysotile, or white asbestos, which had been excavated from the Lowell Asbestos Mine on Belvidere Mountain, Vermont. Note the elongated crystalline structure, and how the fibrils are arranged in both bundles, and as singular units. Asbestos is the name given to a group of six different fibrous minerals: amosite, chrysotile, crocidolite, and the fibrous varieties of tremolite, actinolite, and anthophyllite) that occur naturally in the environment. Chrysotile belongs to the serpentine family of minerals, while all of the others belong to the amphibole family. If you breathe asbestos fibers into your lungs, some of the fibers will be deposited in the air passages and on the cells that make up your lungs. Most fibers are removed from your lungs by being carried away or coughed up in a layer of mucus to the throat, where they are swallowed into the stomach. This usually takes place within a few hours. Fibers that are deposited in the deepest parts of the lung are removed more slowly. In fact, some fibers may move through your lungs and can remain in place for many years and may never be removed from your body. Amphibole asbestos fibers are retained in the lung longer than chrysotile asbestos fibers.

Scanning electron micrograph of asbestos, 1500x

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Kallista Images
Caption:
Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of at a magnification of 1500x showing some of the microcrystalline ultrastructure exhibited by a piece of raw chrysotile, or white asbestos, which had been excavated from the Lowell Asbestos Mine on Belvidere Mountain, Vermont. Note the elongated crystalline structure, and how the fibrils are arranged in both bundles, and as singular units. Asbestos is the name given to a group of six different fibrous minerals: amosite, chrysotile, crocidolite, and the fibrous varieties of tremolite, actinolite, and anthophyllite) that occur naturally in the environment. Chrysotile belongs to the serpentine family of minerals, while all of the others belong to the amphibole family. If you breathe asbestos fibers into your lungs, some of the fibers will be deposited in the air passages and on the cells that make up your lungs. Most fibers are removed from your lungs by being carried away or coughed up in a layer of mucus to the throat, where they are swallowed into the stomach. This usually takes place within a few hours. Fibers that are deposited in the deepest parts of the lung are removed more slowly. In fact, some fibers may move through your lungs and can remain in place for many years and may never be removed from your body. Amphibole asbestos fibers are retained in the lung longer than chrysotile asbestos fibers.
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Scanning Electron Micrograph Of Asbestos 1500x Stock Photo 158929626Asbestos,Black Background,Built Structure,Chrysotile,Close-up,Color Enhanced,Color Image,Crystal,Electron Micrograph,Fiber,Healthcare And Medicine,Horizontal,Illness,Lung,Magnification,No People,Photography,Problems,SEM,Science,Studio Shot,UnprocessedPhotographer Collection: Kallista Images Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of at a magnification of 1500x showing some of the microcrystalline ultrastructure exhibited by a piece of raw chrysotile, or white asbestos, which had been excavated from the Lowell Asbestos Mine on Belvidere Mountain, Vermont. Note the elongated crystalline structure, and how the fibrils are arranged in both bundles, and as singular units. Asbestos is the name given to a group of six different fibrous minerals: amosite, chrysotile, crocidolite, and the fibrous varieties of tremolite, actinolite, and anthophyllite) that occur naturally in the environment. Chrysotile belongs to the serpentine family of minerals, while all of the others belong to the amphibole family. If you breathe asbestos fibers into your lungs, some of the fibers will be deposited in the air passages and on the cells that make up your lungs. Most fibers are removed from your lungs by being carried away or coughed up in a layer of mucus to the throat, where they are swallowed into the stomach. This usually takes place within a few hours. Fibers that are deposited in the deepest parts of the lung are removed more slowly. In fact, some fibers may move through your lungs and can remain in place for many years and may never be removed from your body. Amphibole asbestos fibers are retained in the lung longer than chrysotile asbestos fibers.