Lioness (Panthera leo) showing aggression to lion after mating in Serengeti, Tanzania : Stock Photo
Lioness (Panthera leo) showing aggression to lion after mating in Serengeti, Tanzania : Stock Photo

Lioness (Panthera leo) showing aggression to lion after mating in Serengeti, Tanzania

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The lion (Panthera leo) is one of the four big cats in the genus Panthera and a member of the family Felidae. With some males exceeding 250 kg (550 lb) in weight, it is the second-largest living cat after the tiger. Wild lions currently exist in sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia (where an endangered remnant population resides in Gir Forest National Park in India) while other types of lions have disappeared from North Africa and Southwest Asia in historic times. Until the late Pleistocene, about 10,000 years ago, the lion was the most widespread large land mammal after humans.

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Lioness Showing Aggression To Lion After Mating In Serengeti Tanzania Stock PhotoAggression,Animal Themes,Animal Wildlife,Animals In The Wild,Color Image,Day,Female Animal,Horizontal,Lion - Feline,Lioness,Male Animal,No People,Outdoors,Photography,Serengeti National Park,Tanzania,Two AnimalsPhotographer Collection: Gallo Images The lion (Panthera leo) is one of the four big cats in the genus Panthera and a member of the family Felidae. With some males exceeding 250 kg (550 lb) in weight, it is the second-largest living cat after the tiger. Wild lions currently exist in sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia (where an endangered remnant population resides in Gir Forest National Park in India) while other types of lions have disappeared from North Africa and Southwest Asia in historic times. Until the late Pleistocene, about 10,000 years ago, the lion was the most widespread large land mammal after humans.