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Honey Bee's Exoskeletal Surface : Stock Photo
This scanning electron micrograph depicts the magnified surface of a Western honey bee's exoskeletal surface, revealing the multitude of small setae, or sensorial hairs. These setae detect changes in wind speed and direction, as well as thermal and chemical differences in the bee's environment and are integral in the insect's pollen collecting activities. These setae are not true hairs like the analogous structures found on the skin of mammals, but are extensions of the exoskeletal surface made up of chitin. Chitin is a very hard, linear homopolymer that as a result, is very protective, supportive and durable. Note the debris caught amongst the small hairs, which is primarily made up of vegetative matter, including pollen granules. Magnified 185x. Honey bees are members of the Order Hymenoptera, and there are approximately 20,000 known species of bees, four of which are known as honey bees.
Caption:
This scanning electron micrograph depicts the magnified surface of a Western honey bee's exoskeletal surface, revealing the multitude of small setae, or sensorial hairs. These setae detect changes in wind speed and direction, as well as thermal and chemical differences in the bee's environment and are integral in the insect's pollen collecting activities. These setae are not true hairs like the analogous structures found on the skin of mammals, but are extensions of the exoskeletal surface made up of chitin. Chitin is a very hard, linear homopolymer that as a result, is very protective, supportive and durable. Note the debris caught amongst the small hairs, which is primarily made up of vegetative matter, including pollen granules. Magnified 185x. Honey bees are members of the Order Hymenoptera, and there are approximately 20,000 known species of bees, four of which are known as honey bees.
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Creative #:
135387752
Release info:
No release, but release may not be required.More information
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Science Faction
Max file size:
5,370 x 3,580 px (17.90 x 11.93 in) - 300 dpi - 7.28 MB

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Honey Bees Exoskeletal Surface Stock Photo 135387752Honey Bee,Granule,Animal Body Part,Animal Hair,Arthropod,Bee,Black And White,Exoskeleton,Horizontal,Immunofluorescent Photomicrograph,No People,Photography,Pollen,SEMPhotographer Collection: Science Faction This scanning electron micrograph depicts the magnified surface of a Western honey bee's exoskeletal surface, revealing the multitude of small setae, or sensorial hairs. These setae detect changes in wind speed and direction, as well as thermal and chemical differences in the bee's environment and are integral in the insect's pollen collecting activities. These setae are not true hairs like the analogous structures found on the skin of mammals, but are extensions of the exoskeletal surface made up of chitin. Chitin is a very hard, linear homopolymer that as a result, is very protective, supportive and durable. Note the debris caught amongst the small hairs, which is primarily made up of vegetative matter, including pollen granules. Magnified 185x. Honey bees are members of the Order Hymenoptera, and there are approximately 20,000 known species of bees, four of which are known as honey bees.