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Forth Rail Bridge and Inchgarvie Island and Castle : Stock Photo
Iconic Forth Rail Bridge crossing the Firth of Forth near Edinburgh. Inchgarvie Island and castle fortification in foreground. Bridge built by civil engineers Sir John Fowler and Benjamin Baker. It was finished in 1890. The 2.5 km (1.5 mile) Forth Railway Bridge, the world?s first major steel bridge, has gigantic girder spans of 521 m (1710 ft). Inchgarvie Island has had a castle or fortifications since the Middle Ages. In 1878 the foundations for Thomas Bouch's Forth Bridge were laid on Inchgarvie (and their bricks remain), but after the Tay Bridge Disaster, these plans were abandoned. The west end of the island was extended with a pier, and used as the foundation for one of the Forth Bridge's cantilevers. Painting the Forth Rail Bridge is one of the world's most famous never-ending jobs. Engineering firm Balfour Beatty has applied a new long-lasting paint which will last for 30 years.

Forth Rail Bridge and Inchgarvie Island and Castle

Credit: 
Anna Henly
Caption:
Iconic Forth Rail Bridge crossing the Firth of Forth near Edinburgh. Inchgarvie Island and castle fortification in foreground. Bridge built by civil engineers Sir John Fowler and Benjamin Baker. It was finished in 1890. The 2.5 km (1.5 mile) Forth Railway Bridge, the world?s first major steel bridge, has gigantic girder spans of 521 m (1710 ft). Inchgarvie Island has had a castle or fortifications since the Middle Ages. In 1878 the foundations for Thomas Bouch's Forth Bridge were laid on Inchgarvie (and their bricks remain), but after the Tay Bridge Disaster, these plans were abandoned. The west end of the island was extended with a pier, and used as the foundation for one of the Forth Bridge's cantilevers. Painting the Forth Rail Bridge is one of the world's most famous never-ending jobs. Engineering firm Balfour Beatty has applied a new long-lasting paint which will last for 30 years.
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Creative #:
138964331
Release info:
Not released.More information
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
The Image Bank
Max file size:
5,138 x 3,425 px (17.13 x 11.42 in) - 300 dpi - 9.76 MB

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Forth Rail Bridge And Inchgarvie Island And Castle Stock Photo 138964331Architecture,Bridge,Built Structure,Capital Cities,Castle,Cloud,Color Image,Connection,Day,Edinburgh - Scotland,Fife,Firth of Forth,Firth of Forth Rail Bridge,Horizontal,International Landmark,Island,Lothian,No People,North Queensferry,Outdoors,Photography,Railroad Track,Railway Bridge,River,Scotland,Scottish Culture,Sky,Steel,Transportation,Travel Destinations,UK,newpremiumukPhotographer Collection: The Image Bank (C) Anna Henly PhotographyIconic Forth Rail Bridge crossing the Firth of Forth near Edinburgh. Inchgarvie Island and castle fortification in foreground. Bridge built by civil engineers Sir John Fowler and Benjamin Baker. It was finished in 1890. The 2.5 km (1.5 mile) Forth Railway Bridge, the world?s first major steel bridge, has gigantic girder spans of 521 m (1710 ft). Inchgarvie Island has had a castle or fortifications since the Middle Ages. In 1878 the foundations for Thomas Bouch's Forth Bridge were laid on Inchgarvie (and their bricks remain), but after the Tay Bridge Disaster, these plans were abandoned. The west end of the island was extended with a pier, and used as the foundation for one of the Forth Bridge's cantilevers. Painting the Forth Rail Bridge is one of the world's most famous never-ending jobs. Engineering firm Balfour Beatty has applied a new long-lasting paint which will last for 30 years.