Apatani tribal man walks through dried rice fields : Stock Photo
Ba Khang an elder Apatani tribesman walks through misty fields of dried, harvested rice fields in the village of Hijja, Arunachal Pradesh. The Apatani tribe are one of hundreds of indigenous tribes scattered across India, particularly the north east. Their origins are from Mongolian nomadic tribes whom settled on the Ziro plateau, close to the Chinese border, they practice fixed agriculture as well as forestry, planting trees on the rim of the plateau as well as bamboo forests from which they derive fire wood, building their homes as well as using the bamboo for all manner of applications in their daily lives, cooking utensils and household containers amongst other uses. They carefully cultivate bamboo forests allowing them to grow, but not flower and die, as this would spell disaster for their very own existence. They also tend to their rice fields and live stock for what is mostly a subsistence economy. The Indian constitution recognizes over 500 indigenous tribes, which account for 8.5% of the total population

Apatani tribal man walks through dried rice fields

Credit: Christopher Pillitz
Caption:
Ba Khang an elder Apatani tribesman walks through misty fields of dried, harvested rice fields in the village of Hijja, Arunachal Pradesh. The Apatani tribe are one of hundreds of indigenous tribes scattered across India, particularly the north east. Their origins are from Mongolian nomadic tribes whom settled on the Ziro plateau, close to the Chinese border, they practice fixed agriculture as well as forestry, planting trees on the rim of the plateau as well as bamboo forests from which they derive fire wood, building their homes as well as using the bamboo for all manner of applications in their daily lives, cooking utensils and household containers amongst other uses. They carefully cultivate bamboo forests allowing them to grow, but not flower and die, as this would spell disaster for their very own existence. They also tend to their rice fields and live stock for what is mostly a subsistence economy. The Indian constitution recognizes over 500 indigenous tribes, which account for 8.5% of the total population
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100483370
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Apatani Tribal Man Walks Through Dried Rice Fields Stock Photo 100483370Arunachal Pradesh,Machete,Adult,Adults Only,Agriculture,Confidence,Day,Ethnicity,Fog,Holding,Horizontal,India,Indigenous Culture,Looking At Camera,One Man Only,One Person,One Senior Man Only,Only Men,Outdoors,People,Photography,Portrait,Rice Paddy,Senior Adult,Serene People,Sky,Standing,Sword,Traditional Clothing,Tranquility,Waist UpPhotographer Collection: The Image Bank © Christopher Pillitz /2007Ba Khang an elder Apatani tribesman walks through misty fields of dried, harvested rice fields in the village of Hijja, Arunachal Pradesh. The Apatani tribe are one of hundreds of indigenous tribes scattered across India, particularly the north east. Their origins are from Mongolian nomadic tribes whom settled on the Ziro plateau, close to the Chinese border, they practice fixed agriculture as well as forestry, planting trees on the rim of the plateau as well as bamboo forests from which they derive fire wood, building their homes as well as using the bamboo for all manner of applications in their daily lives, cooking utensils and household containers amongst other uses. They carefully cultivate bamboo forests allowing them to grow, but not flower and die, as this would spell disaster for their very own existence. They also tend to their rice fields and live stock for what is mostly a subsistence economy. The Indian constitution recognizes over 500 indigenous tribes, which account for 8.5% of the total population