An adolescent Lioness observing from the long grass. : Stock Photo
An adolescent Lioness observing from the long grass. : Stock Photo

An adolescent Lioness observing from the long grass.

Creative #: 152886309
The Lion (Panthera leo) is the second largest member of the cat family after the Tiger. Wild Lions currently exist throughout sub-saharan Africa and parts of Asia. They are vulnerable in certain areas, particularly outside of parks and game reserves. Their habitats are mainly savanna and grassland, but can take to the bush and forests. They are very social animals, mainly living in prides of up to 20 animals, consisting of a dominant male, related females and offspring of various ages. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park on the border between northern South Africa and southern Botswana.

Details
License type: Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection: Gallo Images
Max file size: 5,095 x 3,295 px (16.98 x 10.98 in) - 300 dpi - 7.37 MB
Release info: No release required

Similar imagesSearch ResultsSame series
An Adolescent Lioness Observing From The Long Grass Stock PhotoAdolescence,Animal,Animal Themes,Animal Wildlife,Animals Hunting,Animals In The Wild,Botswana,Color Image,Cub,Day,Front View,Horizontal,Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park,Lion - Feline,Lion Cub,Lioness,Nature,No People,One Animal,Outdoors,Photography,Portrait,Safari Animals,South Africa,Southern Africa,Timothy Grass,Tourism,Travel,Travel Destinations,WatchingPhotographer Collection: Gallo Images The Lion (Panthera leo) is the second largest member of the cat family after the Tiger. Wild Lions currently exist throughout sub-saharan Africa and parts of Asia. They are vulnerable in certain areas, particularly outside of parks and game reserves. Their habitats are mainly savanna and grassland, but can take to the bush and forests. They are very social animals, mainly living in prides of up to 20 animals, consisting of a dominant male, related females and offspring of various ages. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park on the border between northern South Africa and southern Botswana.