US-HEALTH-SCIENCE-CANCER-AIDS-CURE : News Photo

US-HEALTH-SCIENCE-CANCER-AIDS-CURE

Credit: 
KAREN BLEIER / Staff
A woman views images of Emily Whitehead on her website on December 12, 2012 in Washington, DC. US doctors say they have saved a seven-year-old girl who was close to dying from leukemia by pioneering the use of an unlikely ally: a modified form of the HIV virus. After fighting her disease with chemotherapy for almost two years and suffering two relapses, the young girl 'faced grim prospects,' doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said. So in February this year they agreed to take her on in an experimental program that fought fire with fire. Helped by a genetically altered HIV virus -- stripped of its devastating properties that cause AIDS -- doctors turned the girl's own immune cells into a superior force able to rout the 'aggressive' leukemia. Emily Whitehead was the first child and is one of only a handful of people in total to be given what's officially known as CTL019 therapy. The hospital stressed this could not yet be called 'a magic bullet.' AFP PHOTO / Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
A woman views images of Emily Whitehead on her website on December 12, 2012 in Washington, DC. US doctors say they have saved a seven-year-old girl who was close to dying from leukemia by pioneering the use of an unlikely ally: a modified form of the HIV virus. After fighting her disease with chemotherapy for almost two years and suffering two relapses, the young girl 'faced grim prospects,' doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said. So in February this year they agreed to take her on in an experimental program that fought fire with fire. Helped by a genetically altered HIV virus -- stripped of its devastating properties that cause AIDS -- doctors turned the girl's own immune cells into a superior force able to rout the 'aggressive' leukemia. Emily Whitehead was the first child and is one of only a handful of people in total to be given what's officially known as CTL019 therapy. The hospital stressed this could not yet be called 'a magic bullet.' AFP PHOTO / Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Calculate price
View cart
Date created:
December 12, 2012
Editorial #:
158254860
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
AFP
Max file size:
4,087 x 2,744 px (56.76 x 38.11 in) - 72 dpi - 5.56 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Was7128192

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
A woman views images of Emily Whitehead on her website on December 12... News Photo 158254860Adult,Healthcare And Medicine,Horizontal,Image,Internet,Photography,USA,View,Washington DC,WomenPhotographer Collection: AFP 2012 AFPA woman views images of Emily Whitehead on her website on December 12, 2012 in Washington, DC. US doctors say they have saved a seven-year-old girl who was close to dying from leukemia by pioneering the use of an unlikely ally: a modified form of the HIV virus. After fighting her disease with chemotherapy for almost two years and suffering two relapses, the young girl 'faced grim prospects,' doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said. So in February this year they agreed to take her on in an experimental program that fought fire with fire. Helped by a genetically altered HIV virus -- stripped of its devastating properties that cause AIDS -- doctors turned the girl's own immune cells into a superior force able to rout the 'aggressive' leukemia. Emily Whitehead was the first child and is one of only a handful of people in total to be given what's officially known as CTL019 therapy. The hospital stressed this could not yet be called 'a magic bullet.' AFP PHOTO / Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)