Tropical Cyclone Carlos : News Photo

Tropical Cyclone Carlos

Credit: 
NASA / Contributor
AUSTRALIA - JULY 18: Tropical Cyclone Carlos strengthened after moving back over the ocean on February 24, 2011. The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported that, as of 11:00 p.m. Western Australia time on February 24, Carlos was located roughly 340 nautical miles (630 kilometers) west-southwest of Learmonth. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 65 knots (120 kilometers per hour) and gusts up to 80 knots (150 kilometers per hour). Carlos had been forecast to intensify after traveling away from land, but the storm did so faster than expected. As a result, the forecast for Carlos changed, the JTWC reported. Forecasters anticipated that it would remain strong despite less favorable conditions, and would weaken more slowly than originally predicted. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image around 2:15 p.m. local time on February 24, 2011. Sporting a circular shape, Carlos hovers off the coast of Western Australia. (Photo by NASA/SSPL/Getty Images)
Caption:
AUSTRALIA - JULY 18: Tropical Cyclone Carlos strengthened after moving back over the ocean on February 24, 2011. The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported that, as of 11:00 p.m. Western Australia time on February 24, Carlos was located roughly 340 nautical miles (630 kilometers) west-southwest of Learmonth. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 65 knots (120 kilometers per hour) and gusts up to 80 knots (150 kilometers per hour). Carlos had been forecast to intensify after traveling away from land, but the storm did so faster than expected. As a result, the forecast for Carlos changed, the JTWC reported. Forecasters anticipated that it would remain strong despite less favorable conditions, and would weaken more slowly than originally predicted. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image around 2:15 p.m. local time on February 24, 2011. Sporting a circular shape, Carlos hovers off the coast of Western Australia. (Photo by NASA/SSPL/Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 18, 2011
Editorial #:
138596763
Restrictions:
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
SSPL
Max file size:
6,000 x 8,000 px (83.33 x 111.11 in) - 72 dpi - 5.8 MB
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Source:
SSPL
Object name:
10567329

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Tropical Cyclone Carlos strengthened after moving back over the ocean... News Photo 138596763Australia,Color Image,Cyclone,Moving,NASA,Rear,Satellite View,Science and Technology,Sea,Tropical,VerticalPhotographer Collection: SSPL SSPL/NASAAUSTRALIA - JULY 18: Tropical Cyclone Carlos strengthened after moving back over the ocean on February 24, 2011. The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported that, as of 11:00 p.m. Western Australia time on February 24, Carlos was located roughly 340 nautical miles (630 kilometers) west-southwest of Learmonth. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 65 knots (120 kilometers per hour) and gusts up to 80 knots (150 kilometers per hour). Carlos had been forecast to intensify after traveling away from land, but the storm did so faster than expected. As a result, the forecast for Carlos changed, the JTWC reported. Forecasters anticipated that it would remain strong despite less favorable conditions, and would weaken more slowly than originally predicted. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image around 2:15 p.m. local time on February 24, 2011. Sporting a circular shape, Carlos hovers off the coast of Western Australia. (Photo by NASA/SSPL/Getty Images)