JAPAN-LIFESTYLE-TOURISM-US-NUCLEAR-DISASTER : News Photo

JAPAN-LIFESTYLE-TOURISM-US-NUCLEAR-DISASTER

Credit: 
TORU YAMANAKA / Staff
To go with Lifestyle-tourism-Japan-US-nuclear-disaster by Kyoko HASEGAWA In this picture taken on July 20, 2013 a tourist looks at debris lay inside a damaged building at an devastated area in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture. Before the huge tsunami virtually wiped it off the map in 2011, Rikuzentakata's pristine beach and luxuriant pine forests were a well-worn stop on Japan's tourist trail. Now the visitors are coming back, but this time they want to see the devastation and the monuments to those who died, the latest example of a phenomenon dubbed 'dark tourism' where holidaymakers pay to witness the aftermath of others' misery. AFP PHOTO / Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
To go with Lifestyle-tourism-Japan-US-nuclear-disaster by Kyoko HASEGAWA In this picture taken on July 20, 2013 a tourist looks at debris lay inside a damaged building at an devastated area in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture. Before the huge tsunami virtually wiped it off the map in 2011, Rikuzentakata's pristine beach and luxuriant pine forests were a well-worn stop on Japan's tourist trail. Now the visitors are coming back, but this time they want to see the devastation and the monuments to those who died, the latest example of a phenomenon dubbed 'dark tourism' where holidaymakers pay to witness the aftermath of others' misery. AFP PHOTO / Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 20, 2013
Editorial #:
174378599
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.To go with Lifestyle-tourism-Japan-US-nuclear-disaster by Kyoko HASEGAWA
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
AFP
Max file size:
4,006 x 2,634 px (55.64 x 36.58 in) - 72 dpi - 2.34 MB
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Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Hkg8822561

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To go with LifestyletourismJapanUSnucleardisaster by Kyoko HASEGAWA... News Photo 174378599Building,Damaged,Debris,Destruction,Geographical Locations,Go,Horizontal,Iwate Prefecture,Japan,Lifestyles,Looking,Lying Down,Picture,Rikuzentakata,TouristPhotographer Collection: AFP 2013 AFPTo go with Lifestyle-tourism-Japan-US-nuclear-disaster by Kyoko HASEGAWA In this picture taken on July 20, 2013 a tourist looks at debris lay inside a damaged building at an devastated area in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture. Before the huge tsunami virtually wiped it off the map in 2011, Rikuzentakata's pristine beach and luxuriant pine forests were a well-worn stop on Japan's tourist trail. Now the visitors are coming back, but this time they want to see the devastation and the monuments to those who died, the latest example of a phenomenon dubbed 'dark tourism' where holidaymakers pay to witness the aftermath of others' misery. AFP PHOTO / Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)