This May 25, 2009 photograph shows a lik : News Photo

This May 25, 2009 photograph shows a lik

This May 25, 2009 photograph shows a likeness of Brussel's most famous statue, Manneken Pis next to a paper face mask people wore to fend off swine flu. Created in 1619, Manneken Pis is among Brussels' most famous statues. Literally translated as 'Little Man Piss,' the statue stands only 2 feet tall. A state in eastern Mexico is to erect a statue to a small boy suspected as being the first patient of swine flu here, to be modeled on the famous Manneken Pis statue of a child urinating in Brussels. Five-year-old Edgar Hernandez appeared in media across the world after the health ministry in April confirmed that he had contracted, and overcome, the A(H1N1) virus at the start of the epidemic's outbreak here. Hernandez's role in putting his poor village of La Gloria on the map merited recognition in the shape of a small statue -- resembling the famous Belgian landmark -- Fidel Herrera Beltran, the governor of Veracruz state in eastern Mexico, told local media. AFP Photo / Paul J.Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
This May 25, 2009 photograph shows a likeness of Brussel's most famous statue, Manneken Pis next to a paper face mask people wore to fend off swine flu. Created in 1619, Manneken Pis is among Brussels' most famous statues. Literally translated as 'Little Man Piss,' the statue stands only 2 feet tall. A state in eastern Mexico is to erect a statue to a small boy suspected as being the first patient of swine flu here, to be modeled on the famous Manneken Pis statue of a child urinating in Brussels. Five-year-old Edgar Hernandez appeared in media across the world after the health ministry in April confirmed that he had contracted, and overcome, the A(H1N1) virus at the start of the epidemic's outbreak here. Hernandez's role in putting his poor village of La Gloria on the map merited recognition in the shape of a small statue -- resembling the famous Belgian landmark -- Fidel Herrera Beltran, the governor of Veracruz state in eastern Mexico, told local media. AFP Photo / Paul J.Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
May 26, 2009
Editorial #:
87973191
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
AFP / Stringer
Collection:
AFP
Credit:
AFP/Getty Images
Max file size:
3,151 x 2,521 px (10.50 x 8.40 in) - 300 dpi - 694 KB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Was2360324

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This May 25 2009 photograph shows a likeness of Brussel's most famous... News Photo 87973191Brussels,Face,Famous,Horizontal,Human Interest,Mannekin Pis,Mask,Most,Paper,People,Photograph,Representing,Show,Statue,Swine Influenza Virus,USA,Vertical,Washington DCPhotographer Collection: AFP 2009 AFPThis May 25, 2009 photograph shows a likeness of Brussel's most famous statue, Manneken Pis next to a paper face mask people wore to fend off swine flu. Created in 1619, Manneken Pis is among Brussels' most famous statues. Literally translated as 'Little Man Piss,' the statue stands only 2 feet tall. A state in eastern Mexico is to erect a statue to a small boy suspected as being the first patient of swine flu here, to be modeled on the famous Manneken Pis statue of a child urinating in Brussels. Five-year-old Edgar Hernandez appeared in media across the world after the health ministry in April confirmed that he had contracted, and overcome, the A(H1N1) virus at the start of the epidemic's outbreak here. Hernandez's role in putting his poor village of La Gloria on the map merited recognition in the shape of a small statue -- resembling the famous Belgian landmark -- Fidel Herrera Beltran, the governor of Veracruz state in eastern Mexico, told local media. AFP Photo / Paul J.Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)