Ruins of Umm El Jimal : News Photo

Ruins of Umm El Jimal

Credit: Jordan Pix / Contributor
UMM AL JIMAL, JORDAN - APRIL 20: This inscription, dated to about AD 265, is late Nabataean and shows signs of transitioning to the Arabic script, commemorates the career of Fihr, is one of the most famous Umm el Jimal inscriptions among the ruins of an ancient village on April 20, 2014 in the midst of modern Umm el-Jimal, Jordan. The ruins date from the Nabataean through the Abbasid periods. The earthquake of circa AD 749 did major damage, but the community survived well into the Abbasid period. In the early twentieth century the area was repopulated by the Druze and then the Bedouin Msa'eid tribe. The eastern most of the major northern cities, Umm Al-Jimal is located at the edge of the eastern basalt desert plain, along a secondary road that was close to the junction of several ancient trade routes that linked central Jordan with Syria and Iraq. Among the most interesting structures to visit are the tall barracks with their little chapel, several large churches, numerous open and roofed water cisterns, the outlines of a Roman fort, and the remains of several town gates. (Photo by Jordan Pix/ Getty Images)
Caption:
UMM AL JIMAL, JORDAN - APRIL 20: This inscription, dated to about AD 265, is late Nabataean and shows signs of transitioning to the Arabic script, commemorates the career of Fihr, is one of the most famous Umm el Jimal inscriptions among the ruins of an ancient village on April 20, 2014 in the midst of modern Umm el-Jimal, Jordan. The ruins date from the Nabataean through the Abbasid periods. The earthquake of circa AD 749 did major damage, but the community survived well into the Abbasid period. In the early twentieth century the area was repopulated by the Druze and then the Bedouin Msa'eid tribe. The eastern most of the major northern cities, Umm Al-Jimal is located at the edge of the eastern basalt desert plain, along a secondary road that was close to the junction of several ancient trade routes that linked central Jordan with Syria and Iraq. Among the most interesting structures to visit are the tall barracks with their little chapel, several large churches, numerous open and roofed water cisterns, the outlines of a Roman fort, and the remains of several town gates. (Photo by Jordan Pix/ Getty Images)
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Date created:
April 20, 2014
Editorial #:
485770463
Release info:
Not released.More information
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Collection:
Getty Images News
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Getty Images Europe
Object name:
79541933

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This inscription dated to about AD 265 is late Nabataean and shows... News Photo 485770463AD,Ancient,Arabic,Commemoration,Cultures,Date,Engraved Image,Engraving,Famous,Horizontal,Human Interest,Jordan,Late,Modern,Occupation,Ruin,Show,Sign,Text,VillagePhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2014 Jordan PixUMM AL JIMAL, JORDAN - APRIL 20: This inscription, dated to about AD 265, is late Nabataean and shows signs of transitioning to the Arabic script, commemorates the career of Fihr, is one of the most famous Umm el Jimal inscriptions among the ruins of an ancient village on April 20, 2014 in the midst of modern Umm el-Jimal, Jordan. The ruins date from the Nabataean through the Abbasid periods. The earthquake of circa AD 749 did major damage, but the community survived well into the Abbasid period. In the early twentieth century the area was repopulated by the Druze and then the Bedouin Msa'eid tribe. The eastern most of the major northern cities, Umm Al-Jimal is located at the edge of the eastern basalt desert plain, along a secondary road that was close to the junction of several ancient trade routes that linked central Jordan with Syria and Iraq. Among the most interesting structures to visit are the tall barracks with their little chapel, several large churches, numerous open and roofed water cisterns, the outlines of a Roman fort, and the remains of several town gates. (Photo by Jordan Pix/ Getty Images)