The Worlds Rarest Typewriters : News Photo

The Worlds Rarest Typewriters

Credit: 
Barcroft Media / Contributor
NEW YORK - UNDATED: EXCLUSIVE. Sun index, New York - 1885. This example of the Sun is an early first version. The design of the Sun, with the sliding selector, predates the Odell patent of 1889. The platen is covered with leather, elegantly stitched together. The Sun types only in capitals. Martin Howard was born in Durham, England in 1959. His father began collecting antique mechanical objects such as butter churns, seeders and medical implements when Martin was a child. Growing up in this environment gave Mr. Howard the desire to form his own collection of something old and mechanical. One day, in 1989, he spotted high upon a shelf in a cluttered junk shop, a very dusty but intriguing item. It turned out to be a Caligraph typewriter from the early 1880s. He was hooked. Mr. Howard has been a collector of the world's first typewriters (1880s & 1890s) ever since, and has amassed one of the most important collection of its kind in the world. The collection consists of 80 pieces and contains many rare and historically important machines. (Photo by antiquetypewriters.com/Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
Caption:
NEW YORK - UNDATED: EXCLUSIVE. Sun index, New York - 1885. This example of the Sun is an early first version. The design of the Sun, with the sliding selector, predates the Odell patent of 1889. The platen is covered with leather, elegantly stitched together. The Sun types only in capitals. Martin Howard was born in Durham, England in 1959. His father began collecting antique mechanical objects such as butter churns, seeders and medical implements when Martin was a child. Growing up in this environment gave Mr. Howard the desire to form his own collection of something old and mechanical. One day, in 1989, he spotted high upon a shelf in a cluttered junk shop, a very dusty but intriguing item. It turned out to be a Caligraph typewriter from the early 1880s. He was hooked. Mr. Howard has been a collector of the world's first typewriters (1880s & 1890s) ever since, and has amassed one of the most important collection of its kind in the world. The collection consists of 80 pieces and contains many rare and historically important machines. (Photo by antiquetypewriters.com/Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
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Date created:
April 05, 2010
Editorial #:
98278231
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.UK NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES OUT
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Barcroft Media
Max file size:
2,513 x 3,227 px (8.38 x 10.76 in) - 300 dpi - 1.94 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Barcroft Media
Object name:
FGH04893

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This example of the Sun is an early first version The design of the... News Photo 98278231Antique,Bizarre,Collection,Exclusive,History,Human Interest,Machinery,Martin Howard,Rare,Typewriter,USA,VerticalPhotographer Collection: Barcroft Media NEW YORK - UNDATED: EXCLUSIVE. Sun index, New York - 1885. This example of the Sun is an early first version. The design of the Sun, with the sliding selector, predates the Odell patent of 1889. The platen is covered with leather, elegantly stitched together. The Sun types only in capitals. Martin Howard was born in Durham, England in 1959. His father began collecting antique mechanical objects such as butter churns, seeders and medical implements when Martin was a child. Growing up in this environment gave Mr. Howard the desire to form his own collection of something old and mechanical. One day, in 1989, he spotted high upon a shelf in a cluttered junk shop, a very dusty but intriguing item. It turned out to be a Caligraph typewriter from the early 1880s. He was hooked. Mr. Howard has been a collector of the world's first typewriters (1880s & 1890s) ever since, and has amassed one of the most important collection of its kind in the world. The collection consists of 80 pieces and contains many rare and historically important machines. (Photo by antiquetypewriters.com/Barcroft USA / Getty Images)