Russian Spy Couple To Face Trial In January : News Photo

Russian Spy Couple To Face Trial In January

Credit: 
Ralph Orlowski / Stringer
FRANKFURT, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 06: The women's prison JVA Frankfurt Preungesheim, where accused Russian spy with alias Heidrun Anschlag is being held, is pictured on November 6, 2012 in Frankfurt, Germany. Anschlag and her husband, alias Andreas Anschlag, were arrested in the fall of 2011 by German police and are scheduled to face trial in January. The couple came to Germany in 1988, reportedly as KGB spies, and continued operating for the modern Russian intelligence service while maintaining a front as immigrants from South America. Among their biggest coups was Dutch Foreign Ministry worker Raymond Valentino Poeteray, who sold them top secret NATO documents. The couple also had a daughter while living in Germany, who is now in her early 20s and reportedly knew nothing of her parents' true identity and espionage activities. German law enforcement authorities came onto the Anschlags' trail following the arrests last year of 10 Russian spies in the United States. (Photo by Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images)
Caption:
FRANKFURT, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 06: The women's prison JVA Frankfurt Preungesheim, where accused Russian spy with alias Heidrun Anschlag is being held, is pictured on November 6, 2012 in Frankfurt, Germany. Anschlag and her husband, alias Andreas Anschlag, were arrested in the fall of 2011 by German police and are scheduled to face trial in January. The couple came to Germany in 1988, reportedly as KGB spies, and continued operating for the modern Russian intelligence service while maintaining a front as immigrants from South America. Among their biggest coups was Dutch Foreign Ministry worker Raymond Valentino Poeteray, who sold them top secret NATO documents. The couple also had a daughter while living in Germany, who is now in her early 20s and reportedly knew nothing of her parents' true identity and espionage activities. German law enforcement authorities came onto the Anschlags' trail following the arrests last year of 10 Russian spies in the United States. (Photo by Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images)
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Date created:
November 06, 2012
Editorial #:
155713010
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The women's prison JVA Frankfurt Preungesheim where accused Russian... News Photo 155713010Adult,Crime Spion Spionage,Defendant,Frankfurt - Main,Germany,Heidrun Anschlag,Horizontal,JVA Frankfurt Preungesheim,Law,Politics,Prison,Russian,Spy,Surveillance,Trial,WomenPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2012 Getty ImagesFRANKFURT, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 06: The women's prison JVA Frankfurt Preungesheim, where accused Russian spy with alias Heidrun Anschlag is being held, is pictured on November 6, 2012 in Frankfurt, Germany. Anschlag and her husband, alias Andreas Anschlag, were arrested in the fall of 2011 by German police and are scheduled to face trial in January. The couple came to Germany in 1988, reportedly as KGB spies, and continued operating for the modern Russian intelligence service while maintaining a front as immigrants from South America. Among their biggest coups was Dutch Foreign Ministry worker Raymond Valentino Poeteray, who sold them top secret NATO documents. The couple also had a daughter while living in Germany, who is now in her early 20s and reportedly knew nothing of her parents' true identity and espionage activities. German law enforcement authorities came onto the Anschlags' trail following the arrests last year of 10 Russian spies in the United States. (Photo by Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images)