Drought And Climate Change Threaten Colorado River Basin : News Photo

Drought And Climate Change Threaten Colorado River Basin

Credit: 
David McNew / Staff
PAGE, AZ - MARCH 27: The sun rises over the low lake level, the result of a six-year drought that has dramatically dropped the level of the reservoir, in Llewellyn Gulch canyon on March 28, 2007 near Page, Arizona.Lake Powell and the next biggest Colorado River reservoir, the nearly 100-year-old Lake Mead, are at the lowest levels ever recorded. Environmentalists have long-lamented the damming of scenic Glen Canyon, the eastern sibling of the Grand Canyon, in the early 1960's to create the 186-mile-long Lake Powell. The US Bureau of Reclamation is evaluating four proposals to manage the drought on the Colorado River which supplies water and power to millions of people in the western states. The bureau has warned that shortages are possible as early as 2010. If the water drops too far, power generators at the dams will become inoperable. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Caption:
PAGE, AZ - MARCH 27: The sun rises over the low lake level, the result of a six-year drought that has dramatically dropped the level of the reservoir, in Llewellyn Gulch canyon on March 28, 2007 near Page, Arizona.Lake Powell and the next biggest Colorado River reservoir, the nearly 100-year-old Lake Mead, are at the lowest levels ever recorded. Environmentalists have long-lamented the damming of scenic Glen Canyon, the eastern sibling of the Grand Canyon, in the early 1960's to create the 186-mile-long Lake Powell. The US Bureau of Reclamation is evaluating four proposals to manage the drought on the Colorado River which supplies water and power to millions of people in the western states. The bureau has warned that shortages are possible as early as 2010. If the water drops too far, power generators at the dams will become inoperable. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Calculate priceView cart
Date created:
March 27, 2007
Editorial #:
73742921
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights for daily newspapers elsewhere, please call.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Getty Images News
Max file size:
3,000 x 2,000 px (10.00 x 6.67 in) - 300 dpi - 933 KB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Getty Images North America
Object name:
73634120DM042_Drought_And_C

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
The sun rises over the low lake level the result of a sixyear drought... News Photo 73742921Advance,Arizona,Biggest,Canyon,Colorado River,Dam,Drought,Environment,Environmental Conservation,Falling,Fuel and Power Generation,Global Warming,Lake Mead,Lake Powell,Level,Level,Low,Page - Arizona,Reservoir,Rise,Sun,Test,USA,Utah,WeatherPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2007 Getty ImagesPAGE, AZ - MARCH 27: The sun rises over the low lake level, the result of a six-year drought that has dramatically dropped the level of the reservoir, in Llewellyn Gulch canyon on March 28, 2007 near Page, Arizona.Lake Powell and the next biggest Colorado River reservoir, the nearly 100-year-old Lake Mead, are at the lowest levels ever recorded. Environmentalists have long-lamented the damming of scenic Glen Canyon, the eastern sibling of the Grand Canyon, in the early 1960's to create the 186-mile-long Lake Powell. The US Bureau of Reclamation is evaluating four proposals to manage the drought on the Colorado River which supplies water and power to millions of people in the western states. The bureau has warned that shortages are possible as early as 2010. If the water drops too far, power generators at the dams will become inoperable. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)