Labour Cabinet : News Photo

Labour Cabinet

Credit: 
London Express / Stringer
10th June 1929: The Labour Cabinet at 10 Downing Street in London. Back row left to right - Tom Shaw, Arthur Greenwood and Noel Buxton. Front row left to right - Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald, Arthur Henderson and Sidney Webb. Ramsay MacDonald was born in Lossiemouth. He moved to London in 1884 where he was active in the Labour movement. He helped to found the Labour Party in 1900 and was elected to the House of Commons as an MP in 1906. He became Labour Party Chairman in 1911 but resigned over the party's refusal to support his opposition to Britain's entry into World War I. MacDonald lost his seat in the House in 1918 but regained it (and the party leadership) in 1922. He went on to become Prime Minister and foreign secretary of the first Labour Government in British history, from January to November 1924. He served as Prime Minister again after the Labour party's victory in the May 1929 election but resigned two years later rather than implement his party's plans to halt the economic depression. He immediately formed a coalition government, which he led as Prime Minister, supported by the Conservatives and Liberals. MacDonald resigned due to ill health in 1935 and served as lord president of the Council in the cabinet of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin until he died in November 1937. Arthur Henderson (1863 - 1935) was born in Glasgow but brought up in Newcastle where he worked as an iron moulder and became a lay preacher. He helped to establish the Labour party and was appointed chairman on several occasions (1908 - 1910, 1914 - 1917 and 1931 - 1932). He also served in the wartime Coalition cabinet and later worked as Home Secretary (1924) and Foreign Secretary (1929 - 1931). His enthusiasm for disarmament issues also led to him being elected chairman of the International Disarmament Conference in 1932. He was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1934. (Photo by London Express/Getty Images)
Caption:
10th June 1929: The Labour Cabinet at 10 Downing Street in London. Back row left to right - Tom Shaw, Arthur Greenwood and Noel Buxton. Front row left to right - Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald, Arthur Henderson and Sidney Webb. Ramsay MacDonald was born in Lossiemouth. He moved to London in 1884 where he was active in the Labour movement. He helped to found the Labour Party in 1900 and was elected to the House of Commons as an MP in 1906. He became Labour Party Chairman in 1911 but resigned over the party's refusal to support his opposition to Britain's entry into World War I. MacDonald lost his seat in the House in 1918 but regained it (and the party leadership) in 1922. He went on to become Prime Minister and foreign secretary of the first Labour Government in British history, from January to November 1924. He served as Prime Minister again after the Labour party's victory in the May 1929 election but resigned two years later rather than implement his party's plans to halt the economic depression. He immediately formed a coalition government, which he led as Prime Minister, supported by the Conservatives and Liberals. MacDonald resigned due to ill health in 1935 and served as lord president of the Council in the cabinet of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin until he died in November 1937. Arthur Henderson (1863 - 1935) was born in Glasgow but brought up in Newcastle where he worked as an iron moulder and became a lay preacher. He helped to establish the Labour party and was appointed chairman on several occasions (1908 - 1910, 1914 - 1917 and 1931 - 1932). He also served in the wartime Coalition cabinet and later worked as Home Secretary (1924) and Foreign Secretary (1929 - 1931). His enthusiasm for disarmament issues also led to him being elected chairman of the International Disarmament Conference in 1932. He was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1934. (Photo by London Express/Getty Images)
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Date created:
June 10, 1929
Editorial #:
3375543
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Hulton Archive
Max file size:
3,498 x 2,662 px (48.58 x 36.97 in) - 72 dpi - 709 KB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Hulton Archive
Barcode:
HQ8662
Object name:
97k/28/huty/7508/20

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The Labour Cabinet at 10 Downing Street in London Back row left to... News Photo 337554310 Downing Street,1920-1929,Archival,Black And White,British,British Culture,British Labor Party,Cabinet,Cabinet Member,Character,Downing Street,Election,England,Government,Group,Home Secretary,Horizontal,Human Interest,International Landmark,James Ramsay MacDonald,London - England,Males,Nobel Peace Prize,People,Politics,Prime Minister,Scottish,Street,Thomas Shaw - Politician,Tom Shaw,UK,WorkingPhotographer Collection: Hulton Archive 10th June 1929: The Labour Cabinet at 10 Downing Street in London. Back row left to right - Tom Shaw, Arthur Greenwood and Noel Buxton. Front row left to right - Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald, Arthur Henderson and Sidney Webb. Ramsay MacDonald was born in Lossiemouth. He moved to London in 1884 where he was active in the Labour movement. He helped to found the Labour Party in 1900 and was elected to the House of Commons as an MP in 1906. He became Labour Party Chairman in 1911 but resigned over the party's refusal to support his opposition to Britain's entry into World War I. MacDonald lost his seat in the House in 1918 but regained it (and the party leadership) in 1922. He went on to become Prime Minister and foreign secretary of the first Labour Government in British history, from January to November 1924. He served as Prime Minister again after the Labour party's victory in the May 1929 election but resigned two years later rather than implement his party's plans to halt the economic depression. He immediately formed a coalition government, which he led as Prime Minister, supported by the Conservatives and Liberals. MacDonald resigned due to ill health in 1935 and served as lord president of the Council in the cabinet of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin until he died in November 1937. Arthur Henderson (1863 - 1935) was born in Glasgow but brought up in Newcastle where he worked as an iron moulder and became a lay preacher. He helped to establish the Labour party and was appointed chairman on several occasions (1908 - 1910, 1914 - 1917 and 1931 - 1932). He also served in the wartime Coalition cabinet and later worked as Home Secretary (1924) and Foreign Secretary (1929 - 1931). His enthusiasm for disarmament issues also led to him being elected chairman of the International Disarmament Conference in 1932. He was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1934. (Photo by London Express/Getty Images)