The house at street Ewiger Tal 28, where accused Russian spies with... News PhotoDefendant,Germany,Horizontal,Law,Legal Trial,Marburg,Politics,Spy,Street,SurveillancePhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2012 Getty ImagesMARBURG, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 07: The house at street Ewiger Tal 28, where accused Russian spies with the aliases Andreas and Heidrun Anschlag last lived, stands on November 7, 2012 in Marburg an der Lahn, Germany. Anschlag and his wife, alias Heidrun Anschlag, were arrested in the fall of 2011 by German police and are scheduled to face trial in January. The couple came to Germany in 1988, reportedly as KGB spies, and continued operating for the modern Russian intelligence service while maintaining a front as immigrants from South America. Among their biggest coups was recruiting Dutch Foreign Ministry worker Raymond Valentino Poeteray, who sold them top secret NATO documents. The couple also had a daughter while living in Germany, who is now in her early 20s and reportedly knew nothing of her parents' true identity and espionage activities. German law enforcement authorities came onto the Anschlags' trail following the arrests last year of 10 Russian spies in the United States. (Photo by Ralph Orlowski/Getty Images)