US-ENERGY-OIL-PUMP JACK : News Photo

US-ENERGY-OIL-PUMP JACK

Credit: 
AFP / Stringer
The horse head(Top), bridle(C) and christmas tree(Bottom) that comprise a pump jack as seen in this August 16, 2012 photo taken near Tioga, North Dakota. In 2001, North Dakota wells produced 31 million barrels of oil, less than 2 percent of which came from the Bakken. Last year the state generated a record 152 million barrels, and more than 80 percent of it was Bakken derived. For 2012, North Dakota's output is projected to surpass that of California (196 million barrels) and possibly even that of Alaska (209 million barrels) and to lag behind only Texas (533 million barrels). Estimates for the total amount of oil that could be recovered from the formation range wildly, from a few billion barrels or less to exponentially more. In an unpublished but nonetheless widely referenced paper from 2000, Leigh Price of the United States Geological Survey estimated that 200 billion barrels of oil could ultimately be extracted. AFP PHOTO/Mark SCHMEETS (Photo credit should read MARK SCHMEETS/AFP/GettyImages)
Caption:
The horse head(Top), bridle(C) and christmas tree(Bottom) that comprise a pump jack as seen in this August 16, 2012 photo taken near Tioga, North Dakota. In 2001, North Dakota wells produced 31 million barrels of oil, less than 2 percent of which came from the Bakken. Last year the state generated a record 152 million barrels, and more than 80 percent of it was Bakken derived. For 2012, North Dakota's output is projected to surpass that of California (196 million barrels) and possibly even that of Alaska (209 million barrels) and to lag behind only Texas (533 million barrels). Estimates for the total amount of oil that could be recovered from the formation range wildly, from a few billion barrels or less to exponentially more. In an unpublished but nonetheless widely referenced paper from 2000, Leigh Price of the United States Geological Survey estimated that 200 billion barrels of oil could ultimately be extracted. AFP PHOTO/Mark SCHMEETS (Photo credit should read MARK SCHMEETS/AFP/GettyImages)
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Date created:
August 16, 2012
Editorial #:
150794370
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Collection:
AFP
Max file size:
3,400 x 4,533 px (47.22 x 62.96 in) - 72 dpi - 9.7 MB
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Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Was6823150

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The horse head bridle and christmas tree that comprise a pump jack as... News Photo 150794370Bridle,Christmas,Christmas Tree,Finance,Fuel and Power Generation,Head,Horse,Jack,North Dakota,Photography,Pump,Setting,Tree,USA,VerticalPhotographer Collection: AFP 2012 AFPThe horse head(Top), bridle(C) and christmas tree(Bottom) that comprise a pump jack as seen in this August 16, 2012 photo taken near Tioga, North Dakota. In 2001, North Dakota wells produced 31 million barrels of oil, less than 2 percent of which came from the Bakken. Last year the state generated a record 152 million barrels, and more than 80 percent of it was Bakken derived. For 2012, North Dakota's output is projected to surpass that of California (196 million barrels) and possibly even that of Alaska (209 million barrels) and to lag behind only Texas (533 million barrels). Estimates for the total amount of oil that could be recovered from the formation range wildly, from a few billion barrels or less to exponentially more. In an unpublished but nonetheless widely referenced paper from 2000, Leigh Price of the United States Geological Survey estimated that 200 billion barrels of oil could ultimately be extracted. AFP PHOTO/Mark SCHMEETS (Photo credit should read MARK SCHMEETS/AFP/GettyImages)