The Pitcher Plant : News Photo

The Pitcher Plant

Credit: 
Istvan Kadar / Contributor
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] The genus Nepenthes (Monkey Cup or Tropical Pitcher plant) is one of the most fascinating of all carnivorous plants. The climbing vines of Nepenthes produce a modified form of leaf called a pitcher hence the common name Tropical Pitcher plant. The size of the pitcher varies and some species are large enough to hold up to two litres of water! The name Monkey Cup arises from the fact that monkeys have been seen to drink water from them in the rainforests. The pitchers are not simply water reservoirs for the plant, hey are actually highly complex passive insect traps, which secrete and absorb a mild to very acidic digestive fluid that contains many as yet undetermined compounds. Insects are attracted to the traps because of nectar secretions and coloration. The slippery rim and inner walls of the pitcher encourage insects to fall into the digestive fluid at the bottom of the trap. Nutrients are absorbed from this soup.
Caption:
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] The genus Nepenthes (Monkey Cup or Tropical Pitcher plant) is one of the most fascinating of all carnivorous plants. The climbing vines of Nepenthes produce a modified form of leaf called a pitcher hence the common name Tropical Pitcher plant. The size of the pitcher varies and some species are large enough to hold up to two litres of water! The name Monkey Cup arises from the fact that monkeys have been seen to drink water from them in the rainforests. The pitchers are not simply water reservoirs for the plant, hey are actually highly complex passive insect traps, which secrete and absorb a mild to very acidic digestive fluid that contains many as yet undetermined compounds. Insects are attracted to the traps because of nectar secretions and coloration. The slippery rim and inner walls of the pitcher encourage insects to fall into the digestive fluid at the bottom of the trap. Nutrients are absorbed from this soup.
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Date created:
January 31, 2013
Editorial #:
160628334
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Moment
Max file size:
4,626 x 4,626 px (64.25 x 64.25 in) - 72 dpi - 11 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Moment Editorial
Object name:
flower20.jpg

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The genus Nepenthes is one of the most fascinating of all carnivorous... News Photo 160628334Canada,Carnivorous,Concentration,Education,Ontario - Canada,Plant,Square,TorontoPhotographer Collection: Moment © Istvan Kadar Photography[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] The genus Nepenthes (Monkey Cup or Tropical Pitcher plant) is one of the most fascinating of all carnivorous plants. The climbing vines of Nepenthes produce a modified form of leaf called a pitcher hence the common name Tropical Pitcher plant. The size of the pitcher varies and some species are large enough to hold up to two litres of water! The name Monkey Cup arises from the fact that monkeys have been seen to drink water from them in the rainforests. The pitchers are not simply water reservoirs for the plant, hey are actually highly complex passive insect traps, which secrete and absorb a mild to very acidic digestive fluid that contains many as yet undetermined compounds. Insects are attracted to the traps because of nectar secretions and coloration. The slippery rim and inner walls of the pitcher encourage insects to fall into the digestive fluid at the bottom of the trap. Nutrients are absorbed from this soup.