Research Shows San Andreas Fault May Be Overdue For Large Earthquake : News Photo

Research Shows San Andreas Fault May Be Overdue For Large Earthquake

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David McNew / Stringer
CALIPATRIA, CA - JULY 1: Steam rises from thermal vents that, until recently, were underwater on the floor of the Salton Sea, on July 1 near Calipatria, California. Scientists have discovered that human-created changes effecting the Salton Sea appear to be the reason why California's massive 'Big One' earthquake is more than 100 years overdue and building up for the greatest disaster ever to hit Los Angeles and Southern California. Researchers found that strands of the San Andreas Fault under the 45-mile long rift lake have have generated at least five 7.0 or larger quakes about every 180 years. This ended in the early 20th century when authorities stopped massive amounts of Colorado River water from periodically flooding the into this sub-sea level desert basin. Such floods used to regularly trigger major quakes and relieve building seismic pressure but the last big earthquake on the southern San Andreas was about 325 years ago. Dangerous new fault branches that could trigger a 7.8 quake have recently been discovered under the Salton Sea. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Caption:
CALIPATRIA, CA - JULY 1: Steam rises from thermal vents that, until recently, were underwater on the floor of the Salton Sea, on July 1 near Calipatria, California. Scientists have discovered that human-created changes effecting the Salton Sea appear to be the reason why California's massive 'Big One' earthquake is more than 100 years overdue and building up for the greatest disaster ever to hit Los Angeles and Southern California. Researchers found that strands of the San Andreas Fault under the 45-mile long rift lake have have generated at least five 7.0 or larger quakes about every 180 years. This ended in the early 20th century when authorities stopped massive amounts of Colorado River water from periodically flooding the into this sub-sea level desert basin. Such floods used to regularly trigger major quakes and relieve building seismic pressure but the last big earthquake on the southern San Andreas was about 325 years ago. Dangerous new fault branches that could trigger a 7.8 quake have recently been discovered under the Salton Sea. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 01, 2011
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Steam rises from thermal vents that until recently were underwater on... News Photo 118433918Blake Sea,California,Calipatria,Calipatria, California,Desert,Earthquake,Emergencies and Disasters,Environment,Environmental Issues,Floor,Geology,Horizontal,Hot Spring,Lake Cahuilla,Lake LeConte,Moving Up,Salton Sea,San Andreas Fault Zone,Science,Steam,Tectonic,USA,Underwater,Vent,Volcano,megaquake,rift zone,temblorPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2011 Getty ImagesCALIPATRIA, CA - JULY 1: Steam rises from thermal vents that, until recently, were underwater on the floor of the Salton Sea, on July 1 near Calipatria, California. Scientists have discovered that human-created changes effecting the Salton Sea appear to be the reason why California's massive 'Big One' earthquake is more than 100 years overdue and building up for the greatest disaster ever to hit Los Angeles and Southern California. Researchers found that strands of the San Andreas Fault under the 45-mile long rift lake have have generated at least five 7.0 or larger quakes about every 180 years. This ended in the early 20th century when authorities stopped massive amounts of Colorado River water from periodically flooding the into this sub-sea level desert basin. Such floods used to regularly trigger major quakes and relieve building seismic pressure but the last big earthquake on the southern San Andreas was about 325 years ago. Dangerous new fault branches that could trigger a 7.8 quake have recently been discovered under the Salton Sea. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)