Sport/Cricket. Politics. Colour illustration, The St. Stephen's Review Presentation Cartoon from 6th July 1889, entitled 'Not Out Yet'. This cricket illustration has a political message, showing the batsman Lord Salisbury, batting for the retention of the : News Photo

Sport/Cricket. Politics. Colour illustration, The St. Stephen's Review Presentation Cartoon from 6th July 1889, entitled 'Not Out Yet'. This cricket illustration has a political message, showing the batsman Lord Salisbury, batting for the retention of the

Sport/Cricket, Politics, Colour illustration, The St, Stephen's Review Presentation Cartoon from 6th July 1889, entitled 'Not Out Yet', This cricket illustration has a political message, showing the batsman Lord Salisbury, batting for the retention of the Union, and the wicket-keeper, behind the stumps his political adversary William Gladstone, a supporter of Irish Home Rule, Salisbury the Conservative is shown wearing a Union Jack cap, while the Liberal Gladsone, dons the green of Ireland with the bails on the stumps reading Union, for, on which subject the two were bitterly divided, During the 1880's when both had terms of office as British Prime Minister, Salisbury argued against and defeated Irish Home Rule Bills forwarded by William Gladstone (Photo by Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty Images)
Caption:
Sport/Cricket, Politics, Colour illustration, The St, Stephen's Review Presentation Cartoon from 6th July 1889, entitled 'Not Out Yet', This cricket illustration has a political message, showing the batsman Lord Salisbury, batting for the retention of the Union, and the wicket-keeper, behind the stumps his political adversary William Gladstone, a supporter of Irish Home Rule, Salisbury the Conservative is shown wearing a Union Jack cap, while the Liberal Gladsone, dons the green of Ireland with the bails on the stumps reading Union, for, on which subject the two were bitterly divided, During the 1880's when both had terms of office as British Prime Minister, Salisbury argued against and defeated Irish Home Rule Bills forwarded by William Gladstone (Photo by Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty Images)
Calculate priceView cart
Date created:
January 01, 1880
Editorial #:
78975501
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
Bob Thomas/Popperfoto / Contributor
Collection:
Popperfoto
Credit:
Popperfoto/Getty Images
Max file size:
2,016 x 3,040 px (6.72 x 10.13 in) - 300 dpi - 1.41 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
Popperfoto
Object name:
BTH30158982

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
Sport/Cricket Politics Colour illustration The St Stephen's Review... News Photo 789755011880-1889,Arts Culture and Entertainment,Batsman,Batting,Beard,British Culture,British Flag,Cap,Clothing,Color Image,Competition,Conservative,Cricket Stump,Defeat,Divided,Green,Humor,Illustration Technique,Irish,Message,Office,Patriotism,Politician,Politics,Prime Minister,Reading,Rivalry,Salisbury,Showing,Social Issues,Sport,Sport of Cricket,Support,Topics,Union,Wicketkeeper,William Ewart GladstonePhotographer Collection: Popperfoto Sport/Cricket, Politics, Colour illustration, The St, Stephen's Review Presentation Cartoon from 6th July 1889, entitled 'Not Out Yet', This cricket illustration has a political message, showing the batsman Lord Salisbury, batting for the retention of the Union, and the wicket-keeper, behind the stumps his political adversary William Gladstone, a supporter of Irish Home Rule, Salisbury the Conservative is shown wearing a Union Jack cap, while the Liberal Gladsone, dons the green of Ireland with the bails on the stumps reading Union, for, on which subject the two were bitterly divided, During the 1880's when both had terms of office as British Prime Minister, Salisbury argued against and defeated Irish Home Rule Bills forwarded by William Gladstone (Photo by Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty Images)