A space suit is mounted to a 'suit port' : News Photo

A space suit is mounted to a 'suit port'

A space suit is mounted to a 'suit port' on the outside of NASA's newest rover prototype Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV), 15 September 2010 on the last day of NASA�s two-week field testing of new aerospace technology at Black Point Lava Flow in the north Arizona desert approximately 40 miles (64 km) north of Flagstaff, Arizona. The suit port will allow astronauts inside the SEV to climb into their suits and out of the rover in only 10 minutes, substantially cutting down on the current spacewalk preparation time of six hours. The testing program, called Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS), is an annual opportunity for NASA engineers and scientists to stress test rovers and other cutting-edge space technologies in an arid environment simulating the conditions found on the surface of the Moon, distant asteroids or Mars. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
A space suit is mounted to a 'suit port' on the outside of NASA's newest rover prototype Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV), 15 September 2010 on the last day of NASA�s two-week field testing of new aerospace technology at Black Point Lava Flow in the north Arizona desert approximately 40 miles (64 km) north of Flagstaff, Arizona. The suit port will allow astronauts inside the SEV to climb into their suits and out of the rover in only 10 minutes, substantially cutting down on the current spacewalk preparation time of six hours. The testing program, called Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS), is an annual opportunity for NASA engineers and scientists to stress test rovers and other cutting-edge space technologies in an arid environment simulating the conditions found on the surface of the Moon, distant asteroids or Mars. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
September 15, 2010
Editorial #:
104185203
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.GOES WITH STORY BY DAVID ANDERSON
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
ROBYN BECK / Staff
Collection:
AFP
Credit:
AFP/Getty Images
Max file size:
3,909 x 2,832 px (13.03 x 9.44 in) - 300 dpi - 3.07 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Was3402561

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A space suit is mounted to a 'suit port' on the outside of NASA's... News Photo 104185203Aerospace Industry,Arizona,Desert,Field,Flagstaff - Arizona,Horizontal,Innovation,Last Day,NASA,New,North,Rover,Science and Technology,Space Mission,Space Suit,Technology,Test,USAPhotographer Collection: AFP 2010 AFPA space suit is mounted to a 'suit port' on the outside of NASA's newest rover prototype Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV), 15 September 2010 on the last day of NASA�s two-week field testing of new aerospace technology at Black Point Lava Flow in the north Arizona desert approximately 40 miles (64 km) north of Flagstaff, Arizona. The suit port will allow astronauts inside the SEV to climb into their suits and out of the rover in only 10 minutes, substantially cutting down on the current spacewalk preparation time of six hours. The testing program, called Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS), is an annual opportunity for NASA engineers and scientists to stress test rovers and other cutting-edge space technologies in an arid environment simulating the conditions found on the surface of the Moon, distant asteroids or Mars. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)