Racial bias law is used to set aside death penalty : News Photo

Racial bias law is used to set aside death penalty

Shirley Burns, center, hugs her friend Margaret Tinsley after Cumberland County Senior Resident Superior Court Judge Greg Weeks found that racial bias played a role in the trial and death row sentencing of Burns' son inmate Marcus Robinson on Friday, April 20, 2012, in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The historic ruling means Robinson's sentence was immediately converted to life without possibility for parole. It was the first case to be decided under the North Carolina's Racial Justice Act. (Shawn Rocco/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Caption:
Shirley Burns, center, hugs her friend Margaret Tinsley after Cumberland County Senior Resident Superior Court Judge Greg Weeks found that racial bias played a role in the trial and death row sentencing of Burns' son inmate Marcus Robinson on Friday, April 20, 2012, in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The historic ruling means Robinson's sentence was immediately converted to life without possibility for parole. It was the first case to be decided under the North Carolina's Racial Justice Act. (Shawn Rocco/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
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Date created:
April 20, 2012
Editorial #:
143169114
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
Raleigh News & Observer / Contributor
Collection:
McClatchy-Tribune
Credit:
MCT via Getty Images
Max file size:
3,004 x 2,003 px (10.01 x 6.68 in) - 300 dpi - 1.14 MB
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Not released.More information
Source:
McClatchy-Tribune
Object name:
781214100

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Shirley Burns center hugs her friend Margaret Tinsley after... News Photo 143169114Burning,Center,Cumberland County Civic Center,Death,Diving into Water,Embracing,Fayetteville - North Carolina,Finding,Friendship,Horizontal,Human Role,Image,In A Row,Law,Males,Marcus Robinson,Multi-Ethnic,North Carolina,Prisoner,Sentencing,Social Issues,Son,Sport,Sports Activity,Trial,USAPhotographer Collection: McClatchy-Tribune 2012 MCTShirley Burns, center, hugs her friend Margaret Tinsley after Cumberland County Senior Resident Superior Court Judge Greg Weeks found that racial bias played a role in the trial and death row sentencing of Burns' son inmate Marcus Robinson on Friday, April 20, 2012, in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The historic ruling means Robinson's sentence was immediately converted to life without possibility for parole. It was the first case to be decided under the North Carolina's Racial Justice Act. (Shawn Rocco/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)