Real Food For Real Kids Owners Lulu Cohen-Farnell And David Farnell : News Photo

Real Food For Real Kids Owners Lulu Cohen-Farnell And David Farnell

TORONTO, ON - APRIL 24: Real Food for Real Kids owners (and married couple) (right) Lulu Cohen-Farnell and David Farnell. Real Food For Real Kids is a Toronto-based company that makes lunches for daycares and schools. They make real food from scratch every day, using whole foods from local farmers. They are in such hot demand, they've expanded and have also been key stakeholders in the new school lunch rules as well as the new local food initiatives. They've won the Toronto Environment Award for 2 years running. They received a notice from the CFIA (Food inspection agency) stating they can't use the words 'local' for their food, which comes from nearby farms, because 'local' is now defined as '50 km away.' There are no farms 50 km away from downtown Toronto and they can't use natural, because that now means taken directly from nature with no farming -- as in fishing, or mushroom picking. (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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TORONTO, ON - APRIL 24: Real Food for Real Kids owners (and married couple) (right) Lulu Cohen-Farnell and David Farnell. Real Food For Real Kids is a Toronto-based company that makes lunches for daycares and schools. They make real food from scratch every day, using whole foods from local farmers. They are in such hot demand, they've expanded and have also been key stakeholders in the new school lunch rules as well as the new local food initiatives. They've won the Toronto Environment Award for 2 years running. They received a notice from the CFIA (Food inspection agency) stating they can't use the words 'local' for their food, which comes from nearby farms, because 'local' is now defined as '50 km away.' There are no farms 50 km away from downtown Toronto and they can't use natural, because that now means taken directly from nature with no farming -- as in fishing, or mushroom picking. (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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Date created:
April 24, 2013
Editorial #:
167423249
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
Carlos Osorio / Contributor
Collection:
Toronto Star
Credit:
Toronto Star via Getty Images
Max file size:
4,251 x 2,830 px (21.26 x 14.15 in) - 200 dpi - 1.83 MB
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Source:
Toronto Star
Object name:
CO-RealFood04.JPG

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Real Food for Real Kids owners Lulu CohenFarnell and David Farnell... News Photo 167423249Canada,Finance,Food,Horizontal,Merchandise,Owner,TorontoPhotographer Collection: Toronto Star 2013 Toronto StarTORONTO, ON - APRIL 24: Real Food for Real Kids owners (and married couple) (right) Lulu Cohen-Farnell and David Farnell. Real Food For Real Kids is a Toronto-based company that makes lunches for daycares and schools. They make real food from scratch every day, using whole foods from local farmers. They are in such hot demand, they've expanded and have also been key stakeholders in the new school lunch rules as well as the new local food initiatives. They've won the Toronto Environment Award for 2 years running. They received a notice from the CFIA (Food inspection agency) stating they can't use the words 'local' for their food, which comes from nearby farms, because 'local' is now defined as '50 km away.' There are no farms 50 km away from downtown Toronto and they can't use natural, because that now means taken directly from nature with no farming -- as in fishing, or mushroom picking. (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)