Survivors of Khmer Rouge's killing machine : News Photo

Survivors of Khmer Rouge's killing machine

PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA - MAY 2: Pictures of former prisoners, here a mother with an infant, on display in the infamous S-21 prison May 2, 2007 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The former prison is now a genocide museum that bears testament to the horrendous acts committed by the Khmer Rouge on its own people. The S-21prison, or Toul Sleng as it was also known, was the Khmer Rouge's most brutal prison. It was here that alleged enemies of Pol Pot's communist revolution underwent brutal torture until they admitted to committing fictitious crimes against the revolution. It is believed that more than 14000 people lost their lives either in the prison on when their death sentences were being carried out in the Killing Fields on the outskirts of the city. Only a handful has been known to survive, most notably seven people who were alive when the Vietnamese invaded the country in 1979. (Photo by David Hogsholt/Reportage by Getty Images)
Caption:
PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA - MAY 2: Pictures of former prisoners, here a mother with an infant, on display in the infamous S-21 prison May 2, 2007 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The former prison is now a genocide museum that bears testament to the horrendous acts committed by the Khmer Rouge on its own people. The S-21prison, or Toul Sleng as it was also known, was the Khmer Rouge's most brutal prison. It was here that alleged enemies of Pol Pot's communist revolution underwent brutal torture until they admitted to committing fictitious crimes against the revolution. It is believed that more than 14000 people lost their lives either in the prison on when their death sentences were being carried out in the Killing Fields on the outskirts of the city. Only a handful has been known to survive, most notably seven people who were alive when the Vietnamese invaded the country in 1979. (Photo by David Hogsholt/Reportage by Getty Images)
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Date created:
May 02, 2007
Editorial #:
81519458
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
David Hogsholt / Contributor
Collection:
Getty Images News
Credit:
Getty Images
Max file size:
4,368 x 2,912 px (14.56 x 9.71 in) - 300 dpi - 10.4 MB
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Source:
Getty Images North America
Object name:
78761549DH004_s21

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Pictures of former prisoners here a mother with an infant on display... News Photo 81519458Baby,Cambodia,Cambodian Genocide,Display,Former,Genocide,Horizontal,Human Interest,Infamous,Khmer Rouge,Law,Mass Murder,Mother,Phnom Penh,Photography,Prisoner,Social Issues,Survival,Tortured,Trial,Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum,ViolencePhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2007 David HogsholtPHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA - MAY 2: Pictures of former prisoners, here a mother with an infant, on display in the infamous S-21 prison May 2, 2007 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The former prison is now a genocide museum that bears testament to the horrendous acts committed by the Khmer Rouge on its own people. The S-21prison, or Toul Sleng as it was also known, was the Khmer Rouge's most brutal prison. It was here that alleged enemies of Pol Pot's communist revolution underwent brutal torture until they admitted to committing fictitious crimes against the revolution. It is believed that more than 14000 people lost their lives either in the prison on when their death sentences were being carried out in the Killing Fields on the outskirts of the city. Only a handful has been known to survive, most notably seven people who were alive when the Vietnamese invaded the country in 1979. (Photo by David Hogsholt/Reportage by Getty Images)