The Yawar Fiesta, a Ritual Fight Between the Condor and the Bull in Peru : News Photo

The Yawar Fiesta, a Ritual Fight Between the Condor and the Bull in Peru

COTABAMBAS, PERU - JULY 30: A Peruvian peasant plays a trumpet during the Yawar Fiesta, a ritual fight between the condor and the bull, held in the mountains of Apurímac on 30 July 2012 in Cotabambas, Peru. The Yawar Fiesta (Feast of Blood), an indigenous tradition which dates back to the time of the conquest, consists basically of an extraordinary bullfight in which three protagonists take part - a wild condor, a wild bull and brave young men of the neighboring communities. The captured condor, a sacred bird venerated by the Indians, is tied in the back of the bull which is carefully selected for its strength and pugnacity. A condor symbolizes the native inhabitants of the Andes, while a bull symbolically represents the Spanish invaders. Young boys, chasing the fighting animals, wish to show their courage in front of the community. However, the Indians usually do not allow the animals to fight for a long time because death or harm of the condor is interpreted as a sign of misfortune to the community. (Photo by Jan Sochor/Latincontent/Getty Images)
Caption:
COTABAMBAS, PERU - JULY 30: A Peruvian peasant plays a trumpet during the Yawar Fiesta, a ritual fight between the condor and the bull, held in the mountains of Apurímac on 30 July 2012 in Cotabambas, Peru. The Yawar Fiesta (Feast of Blood), an indigenous tradition which dates back to the time of the conquest, consists basically of an extraordinary bullfight in which three protagonists take part - a wild condor, a wild bull and brave young men of the neighboring communities. The captured condor, a sacred bird venerated by the Indians, is tied in the back of the bull which is carefully selected for its strength and pugnacity. A condor symbolizes the native inhabitants of the Andes, while a bull symbolically represents the Spanish invaders. Young boys, chasing the fighting animals, wish to show their courage in front of the community. However, the Indians usually do not allow the animals to fight for a long time because death or harm of the condor is interpreted as a sign of misfortune to the community. (Photo by Jan Sochor/Latincontent/Getty Images)
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Date created:
November 21, 2012
Editorial #:
157153723
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Jan Sochor/CON / Contributor
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LatinContent Editorial
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LatinContent/Getty Images
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LatinContent Editorial
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Peruvian peasant plays a trumpet during the Yawar Fiesta a ritual... News Photo 157153723Adult,Andes,Apurimac,Banquet,Blood,Brass,Bull,Celebration,Ceremony,Condor,Cultures,Dancing,Farm Worker,Fighting,Full Length,Horizontal,Indian,Indigenous Culture,Latin America,Latin American and Hispanic Ethnicity,Men,Mountain,Mountain Range,Music,Native,Outdoors,Peru,Peruvian,Playing,Religion,Symbol,TrumpetPhotographer Collection: LatinContent Editorial 2012 Jan SochorCOTABAMBAS, PERU - JULY 30: A Peruvian peasant plays a trumpet during the Yawar Fiesta, a ritual fight between the condor and the bull, held in the mountains of Apurímac on 30 July 2012 in Cotabambas, Peru. The Yawar Fiesta (Feast of Blood), an indigenous tradition which dates back to the time of the conquest, consists basically of an extraordinary bullfight in which three protagonists take part - a wild condor, a wild bull and brave young men of the neighboring communities. The captured condor, a sacred bird venerated by the Indians, is tied in the back of the bull which is carefully selected for its strength and pugnacity. A condor symbolizes the native inhabitants of the Andes, while a bull symbolically represents the Spanish invaders. Young boys, chasing the fighting animals, wish to show their courage in front of the community. However, the Indians usually do not allow the animals to fight for a long time because death or harm of the condor is interpreted as a sign of misfortune to the community. (Photo by Jan Sochor/Latincontent/Getty Images)