Rock and Roll Hall of Fame should induct the band Yes : News Photo

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame should induct the band Yes

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The Washington Post / Contributor
CLEVELAND, OHIO - Oct. 31, 2013: 'The Teacher', a 30-foot-tall inflatable sculpture, looms over 'The Wall', from Pink Floyd's famous live stage performances of their 1979 album 'The Wall'. It is on permanent display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a story about Voices for Yes, a bi-partisan effort on behalf of Democrats and Republicans to get the rock band Yes into the Roll Hall of Fame, which had been snubbed by the nominating committee since 1995 until this year. It's the brainchild of John Brabender, who ran Rick Santorum's presidential campaign, and Tad Devine, who was a senior advisor to John Kerry's and Al Gore's bids for the White House. It is a look at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, how it operates, and the band Yes, who was the most successful of the progressive rock bands of the 1970s, who has always had a passionate fan base but never quite the critics' darlings. (Photo by Lisa DeJong/For the Washington Post)
Caption:
CLEVELAND, OHIO - Oct. 31, 2013: 'The Teacher', a 30-foot-tall inflatable sculpture, looms over 'The Wall', from Pink Floyd's famous live stage performances of their 1979 album 'The Wall'. It is on permanent display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a story about Voices for Yes, a bi-partisan effort on behalf of Democrats and Republicans to get the rock band Yes into the Roll Hall of Fame, which had been snubbed by the nominating committee since 1995 until this year. It's the brainchild of John Brabender, who ran Rick Santorum's presidential campaign, and Tad Devine, who was a senior advisor to John Kerry's and Al Gore's bids for the White House. It is a look at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, how it operates, and the band Yes, who was the most successful of the progressive rock bands of the 1970s, who has always had a passionate fan base but never quite the critics' darlings. (Photo by Lisa DeJong/For the Washington Post)
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Date created:
October 31, 2013
Editorial #:
453895507
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The Washington Post
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The Washington Post
Object name:
Yes5.jpg

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'The Teacher' a 30foottall inflatable sculpture looms over 'The Wall'... News PhotoCleveland - Ohio,Horizontal,Human Interest,Inflatable,Loom,Ohio,Pink Floyd,Rock & Roll Hall of Fame,Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame - Cleveland,Sculpture,Stage - Performance Space,USAPhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2013 The Washington PostCLEVELAND, OHIO - Oct. 31, 2013: 'The Teacher', a 30-foot-tall inflatable sculpture, looms over 'The Wall', from Pink Floyd's famous live stage performances of their 1979 album 'The Wall'. It is on permanent display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a story about Voices for Yes, a bi-partisan effort on behalf of Democrats and Republicans to get the rock band Yes into the Roll Hall of Fame, which had been snubbed by the nominating committee since 1995 until this year. It's the brainchild of John Brabender, who ran Rick Santorum's presidential campaign, and Tad Devine, who was a senior advisor to John Kerry's and Al Gore's bids for the White House. It is a look at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, how it operates, and the band Yes, who was the most successful of the progressive rock bands of the 1970s, who has always had a passionate fan base but never quite the critics' darlings. (Photo by Lisa DeJong/For the Washington Post)