Iraq 2012:  The Summer After the U.S. Military Pullout : News Photo

Iraq 2012: The Summer After the U.S. Military Pullout

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The Washington Post / Contributor
BAGHDAD, IRAQ - JULY 15: A messy web of electrical wires runs from two privately-owned generators to nearby businesses and residences in the Sadr City section of Baghdad on Sunday, July 15, 2012, in Baghdad, Iraq. Oil production and revenues are at levels not seen since before former president Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in 1990. Yet the government barely provides the basics of lifeÑclean water and electricity on summer days that routinely crack 120 degrees. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, IraqÕs democratically elected leader, presides over a government that, according to critics from international human rights groups to Baghdad bus drivers, is ineffective and increasingly authoritarian and brutal to its political enemies. Corruption is rampant, and people complain that bribery is the only way to get a job, a building permit or a government contract. Transparency International listed Iraq as the 175th worst out of 183 countries in its 2011 annual corruption survey. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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BAGHDAD, IRAQ - JULY 15: A messy web of electrical wires runs from two privately-owned generators to nearby businesses and residences in the Sadr City section of Baghdad on Sunday, July 15, 2012, in Baghdad, Iraq. Oil production and revenues are at levels not seen since before former president Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in 1990. Yet the government barely provides the basics of lifeÑclean water and electricity on summer days that routinely crack 120 degrees. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, IraqÕs democratically elected leader, presides over a government that, according to critics from international human rights groups to Baghdad bus drivers, is ineffective and increasingly authoritarian and brutal to its political enemies. Corruption is rampant, and people complain that bribery is the only way to get a job, a building permit or a government contract. Transparency International listed Iraq as the 175th worst out of 183 countries in its 2011 annual corruption survey. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 16, 2012
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149781264
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messy web of electrical wires runs from two privatelyowned generators... News Photo 149781264Baghdad,Business,Close To,Cross Section,Electricity,Generator,Horizontal,Human Interest,Iraq,Messy,Residential Structure,Run,Sadr City,Web,WirePhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2011 The Washington PostBAGHDAD, IRAQ - JULY 15: A messy web of electrical wires runs from two privately-owned generators to nearby businesses and residences in the Sadr City section of Baghdad on Sunday, July 15, 2012, in Baghdad, Iraq. Oil production and revenues are at levels not seen since before former president Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in 1990. Yet the government barely provides the basics of lifeÑclean water and electricity on summer days that routinely crack 120 degrees. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, IraqÕs democratically elected leader, presides over a government that, according to critics from international human rights groups to Baghdad bus drivers, is ineffective and increasingly authoritarian and brutal to its political enemies. Corruption is rampant, and people complain that bribery is the only way to get a job, a building permit or a government contract. Transparency International listed Iraq as the 175th worst out of 183 countries in its 2011 annual corruption survey. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)