Sole Survivor of 1981 Soviet Plane Collision Speaks : News Photo

Sole Survivor of 1981 Soviet Plane Collision Speaks

Credit: 
East News / Contributor
384353 11: (FILE PHOTO) Larisa Savitskaya, right, the sole survivor of a 1981 mid-air plane collision which killed 26 people on the two aircraft, has a picnic in the forest with her husband Vladimir, top left, and friends in this photo from before the airplane crash. Savitskaya spoke publicly about the crash for the first time January 11, 2001 in Moscow, Russia. Savitskaya and her husband were returning from their honeymoon on August 24, 1981 when their Aeroflot AN-24 plane was ripped apart in a collision with a Soviet Tu-16k heavy bomber and plunged 5220 meters to earth. Savitskaya was found by a group of amazed rescuers three days later. Savitskaya, who eventually resumed her job as a sales manager, was warned by the KGB not to talk in public about her ordeal. Paid just $20 (75 Soviet Rubles in 1981) compensation by Aeroflot, the state airline, and now too poor even to afford the painkillers on which she relies, Savitskaya is planning on writing a book about the accident. (Photo by East News/Liaison) (USA SALES ONLY)
Caption:
384353 11: (FILE PHOTO) Larisa Savitskaya, right, the sole survivor of a 1981 mid-air plane collision which killed 26 people on the two aircraft, has a picnic in the forest with her husband Vladimir, top left, and friends in this photo from before the airplane crash. Savitskaya spoke publicly about the crash for the first time January 11, 2001 in Moscow, Russia. Savitskaya and her husband were returning from their honeymoon on August 24, 1981 when their Aeroflot AN-24 plane was ripped apart in a collision with a Soviet Tu-16k heavy bomber and plunged 5220 meters to earth. Savitskaya was found by a group of amazed rescuers three days later. Savitskaya, who eventually resumed her job as a sales manager, was warned by the KGB not to talk in public about her ordeal. Paid just $20 (75 Soviet Rubles in 1981) compensation by Aeroflot, the state airline, and now too poor even to afford the painkillers on which she relies, Savitskaya is planning on writing a book about the accident. (Photo by East News/Liaison) (USA SALES ONLY)
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Date created:
January 11, 2001
Editorial #:
809580
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Collection:
Hulton Archive
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Source:
Hulton Archive
Object name:
38435311plan_20010628_17097.jpg

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Larisa Savitskaya right the sole survivor of a 1981 midair plane... News Photo 809580Airplane,Airplane Crash,Black And White,Crash,Death,Eating,Emergencies and Disasters,Forest,Friendship,Husband,Mid-Air,Moscow,People,Picnic,Russia,Russian Culture,Sole,SurvivalPhotographer Collection: Hulton Archive 384353 11: (FILE PHOTO) Larisa Savitskaya, right, the sole survivor of a 1981 mid-air plane collision which killed 26 people on the two aircraft, has a picnic in the forest with her husband Vladimir, top left, and friends in this photo from before the airplane crash. Savitskaya spoke publicly about the crash for the first time January 11, 2001 in Moscow, Russia. Savitskaya and her husband were returning from their honeymoon on August 24, 1981 when their Aeroflot AN-24 plane was ripped apart in a collision with a Soviet Tu-16k heavy bomber and plunged 5220 meters to earth. Savitskaya was found by a group of amazed rescuers three days later. Savitskaya, who eventually resumed her job as a sales manager, was warned by the KGB not to talk in public about her ordeal. Paid just $20 (75 Soviet Rubles in 1981) compensation by Aeroflot, the state airline, and now too poor even to afford the painkillers on which she relies, Savitskaya is planning on writing a book about the accident. (Photo by East News/Liaison) (USA SALES ONLY)