AFGHANISTAN-ECONOMY-SILK : News Photo

AFGHANISTAN-ECONOMY-SILK

Credit: 
AREF KARIMI / Stringer
In this photograph taken on May 22, 2014, an Afghan worker collects a cocoon from dried mulberry leaves in Zandajan district of Herat province. Once a stop along the Silk Road trade route, western Afghanistan has a long tradition of producing silk used to weave carpets, a process that dates back thousands of years. Carpets are Afghanistan's best-known export, woven mostly by women and children in the north of the country, a trade which once employed, directly or indirectly, six million people, or a fifth of the country's population, although that figure has dropped sharply. In cooperation with a non-profit organisation the Department of Agriculture in Herat provided some 5,050 silkworm boxes to several districts at the beginning of 2014 to revive silk production in the region. Some 42,500 women and their families are involved in the project which aims to provide a means of subsistence and potentially lead to international market access for silk producers in the country. The popular wool and silk Afghan carpets made by different tribes can sell for a price that can range between 150 USD to thousands of dollars. AFP PHOTO/Aref Karimi (Photo credit should read Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
In this photograph taken on May 22, 2014, an Afghan worker collects a cocoon from dried mulberry leaves in Zandajan district of Herat province. Once a stop along the Silk Road trade route, western Afghanistan has a long tradition of producing silk used to weave carpets, a process that dates back thousands of years. Carpets are Afghanistan's best-known export, woven mostly by women and children in the north of the country, a trade which once employed, directly or indirectly, six million people, or a fifth of the country's population, although that figure has dropped sharply. In cooperation with a non-profit organisation the Department of Agriculture in Herat provided some 5,050 silkworm boxes to several districts at the beginning of 2014 to revive silk production in the region. Some 42,500 women and their families are involved in the project which aims to provide a means of subsistence and potentially lead to international market access for silk producers in the country. The popular wool and silk Afghan carpets made by different tribes can sell for a price that can range between 150 USD to thousands of dollars. AFP PHOTO/Aref Karimi (Photo credit should read Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
May 22, 2014
Editorial #:
452911842
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.PHOTO PACKAGE 5/34
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
AFP
Max file size:
3,000 x 1,996 px (41.67 x 27.72 in) - 72 dpi - 1.15 MB
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Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Del6326088

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In this photograph taken on May 22 an Afghan worker collects a cocoon... News Photo 452911842Afghan,Afghanistan,Cocoon,Collection,District,Dried,Herat,Horizontal,Human Interest,Leaves,Mulberry,Occupation,Photograph,Province,ZandajanPhotographer Collection: AFP In this photograph taken on May 22, 2014, an Afghan worker collects a cocoon from dried mulberry leaves in Zandajan district of Herat province. Once a stop along the Silk Road trade route, western Afghanistan has a long tradition of producing silk used to weave carpets, a process that dates back thousands of years. Carpets are Afghanistan's best-known export, woven mostly by women and children in the north of the country, a trade which once employed, directly or indirectly, six million people, or a fifth of the country's population, although that figure has dropped sharply. In cooperation with a non-profit organisation the Department of Agriculture in Herat provided some 5,050 silkworm boxes to several districts at the beginning of 2014 to revive silk production in the region. Some 42,500 women and their families are involved in the project which aims to provide a means of subsistence and potentially lead to international market access for silk producers in the country. The popular wool and silk Afghan carpets made by different tribes can sell for a price that can range between 150 USD to thousands of dollars. AFP PHOTO/Aref Karimi (Photo credit should read Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images)