INDIA-LIFESTYLE-CONSUMER-TECHNOLOGY : News Photo

INDIA-LIFESTYLE-CONSUMER-TECHNOLOGY

In this photograph taken on December 13, 2012 a man washes clothes as another one brushes his teeth in the early morning at an open air laundry facility known as the Dhobi Ghat in Mumbai. This 25-acre (10-hectare) space is a chaotic conglomeration of rows of open-air concrete wash pens, each with its own flogging stone and rooms where the washermen, also known as 'dhobiwallahs', sleep and work. Many of the over 700 families that make a living out of this Dhobi Ghat, who had followed their father into the business, a life of dunking, thrashing and drying close to 1,000 items of clothing each day for just 7 USD, are worried about the future as the workload has gone down considerably. Most ordinary Indians who have seen their disposable incomes rise as the country's economy expands, have dispensed with the services of the dhobiwallahs for good since most modern homes are equipped with a washing machine. AFP PHOTO / Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
In this photograph taken on December 13, 2012 a man washes clothes as another one brushes his teeth in the early morning at an open air laundry facility known as the Dhobi Ghat in Mumbai. This 25-acre (10-hectare) space is a chaotic conglomeration of rows of open-air concrete wash pens, each with its own flogging stone and rooms where the washermen, also known as 'dhobiwallahs', sleep and work. Many of the over 700 families that make a living out of this Dhobi Ghat, who had followed their father into the business, a life of dunking, thrashing and drying close to 1,000 items of clothing each day for just 7 USD, are worried about the future as the workload has gone down considerably. Most ordinary Indians who have seen their disposable incomes rise as the country's economy expands, have dispensed with the services of the dhobiwallahs for good since most modern homes are equipped with a washing machine. AFP PHOTO / Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
December 13, 2012
Editorial #:
158607191
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
ROBERTO SCHMIDT / Staff
Collection:
AFP
Credit:
AFP/Getty Images
Max file size:
5,520 x 3,680 px (76.67 x 51.11 in) - 72 dpi - 2.94 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Hkg8119356

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In this photograph taken on December 13 2012 a man washes clothes as... News Photo 158607191Adult,Brush,Built Structure,Clothing,Dhobi Ghat,Horizontal,Human Interest,India,Laundry,Men,Morning,Mumbai,Open,Photograph,Teeth,Washing,WindPhotographer Collection: AFP 2012 AFPIn this photograph taken on December 13, 2012 a man washes clothes as another one brushes his teeth in the early morning at an open air laundry facility known as the Dhobi Ghat in Mumbai. This 25-acre (10-hectare) space is a chaotic conglomeration of rows of open-air concrete wash pens, each with its own flogging stone and rooms where the washermen, also known as 'dhobiwallahs', sleep and work. Many of the over 700 families that make a living out of this Dhobi Ghat, who had followed their father into the business, a life of dunking, thrashing and drying close to 1,000 items of clothing each day for just 7 USD, are worried about the future as the workload has gone down considerably. Most ordinary Indians who have seen their disposable incomes rise as the country's economy expands, have dispensed with the services of the dhobiwallahs for good since most modern homes are equipped with a washing machine. AFP PHOTO / Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)