US-ENVIRONMENT-CALIFORNIA-WATER : News Photo

US-ENVIRONMENT-CALIFORNIA-WATER

Credit: 
FREDERIC J. BROWN / Staff
Geoffrey McQuilkin of the Mono Lake Committee and Los Angeles Aqueduct Manager James Yannotta pose while holding a bumper-sticker which says 'I Save Water for Mono Lake' following a re-enactment of the moment the Los Angeles Aqueduct gates were first opened 100 years ago, on November 5, 2013 in Sylmar, California, sending water gushing towards the city during an event marking the 100th anniversary of the opening of the 233-mile Los Angeles Aqueduct, which transports water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles. The aqueduct started bringing water from the Owens River on the eastern slope of the Sierra Mountains to Los Angeles in November 1913 and the massive public works project is widely credited with transforming Los Angeles from a sleepy agricultural town into a modern metropolis, allowing for the city's rapid expansion. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
Geoffrey McQuilkin of the Mono Lake Committee and Los Angeles Aqueduct Manager James Yannotta pose while holding a bumper-sticker which says 'I Save Water for Mono Lake' following a re-enactment of the moment the Los Angeles Aqueduct gates were first opened 100 years ago, on November 5, 2013 in Sylmar, California, sending water gushing towards the city during an event marking the 100th anniversary of the opening of the 233-mile Los Angeles Aqueduct, which transports water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles. The aqueduct started bringing water from the Owens River on the eastern slope of the Sierra Mountains to Los Angeles in November 1913 and the massive public works project is widely credited with transforming Los Angeles from a sleepy agricultural town into a modern metropolis, allowing for the city's rapid expansion. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
November 05, 2013
Editorial #:
187035881
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Collection:
AFP
Max file size:
4,500 x 2,765 px (62.50 x 38.40 in) - 72 dpi - 2.42 MB
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Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Was8053744

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Geoffrey McQuilkin of the Mono Lake Committee and Los Angeles... News Photo 187035881Anniversary,California,City,City Of Los Angeles,Environmental Issues,Event,Flowing,Following,Gate,Geoffrey McQuilkin,Hold,Horizontal,I Save Water for Mono Lake,James Yannotta,Los Angeles Aqueduct,Marking,Moment,Mono Lake Committee,Open,Opening Event,Owens Valley,Portrait,Reenactment,Sending,Sylmar,Sylmar, California,Transportation,USA,Water,bumper-stickerPhotographer Collection: AFP 2013 AFPGeoffrey McQuilkin of the Mono Lake Committee and Los Angeles Aqueduct Manager James Yannotta pose while holding a bumper-sticker which says 'I Save Water for Mono Lake' following a re-enactment of the moment the Los Angeles Aqueduct gates were first opened 100 years ago, on November 5, 2013 in Sylmar, California, sending water gushing towards the city during an event marking the 100th anniversary of the opening of the 233-mile Los Angeles Aqueduct, which transports water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles. The aqueduct started bringing water from the Owens River on the eastern slope of the Sierra Mountains to Los Angeles in November 1913 and the massive public works project is widely credited with transforming Los Angeles from a sleepy agricultural town into a modern metropolis, allowing for the city's rapid expansion. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)