Four Detective Cameras, 1889-1908. : News Photo

Four Detective Cameras, 1889-1908.

Credit: 
Science & Society Picture Library / Contributor
UNSPECIFIED - JULY 18: From the 1880s, hand-held exposures became possible for the first time because of the introduction of gelatin-silver bromide emulsion plates. This prompted some manufacturers to make cameras disguised as, or in the shape of, everyday objects known as 'detective cameras', designed for taking candid shots without the subject being aware they were being photographed. The Goerz Binocular camera (1908) doubled as opera glasses; Houghton's Ticka camera (1906) looked like a pocket watch; and the best-selling circular waistcoat camera by Stirn (1889) was designed to be concealed inside a waistcoat. The Fallowfield Facile of 1888 was disguised as a wooden box, parcel or case, complete with straps and a carrying handle. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Caption:
UNSPECIFIED - JULY 18: From the 1880s, hand-held exposures became possible for the first time because of the introduction of gelatin-silver bromide emulsion plates. This prompted some manufacturers to make cameras disguised as, or in the shape of, everyday objects known as 'detective cameras', designed for taking candid shots without the subject being aware they were being photographed. The Goerz Binocular camera (1908) doubled as opera glasses; Houghton's Ticka camera (1906) looked like a pocket watch; and the best-selling circular waistcoat camera by Stirn (1889) was designed to be concealed inside a waistcoat. The Fallowfield Facile of 1888 was disguised as a wooden box, parcel or case, complete with straps and a carrying handle. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 18, 1995
Editorial #:
90728122
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
SSPL
Max file size:
3,504 x 2,463 px (11.68 x 8.21 in) - 300 dpi - 667 KB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
SSPL
Object name:
10253916

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From the 1880s handheld exposures became possible for the first time... News Photo 90728122Arts Culture and Entertainment,Candid,Disguise,Greeting,Hand Held,Hiding,Horizontal,Opera Glasses,Photography,Plate,Pocket Watch,ThompsonPhotographer Collection: SSPL SSPL/National Media MuseumUNSPECIFIED - JULY 18: From the 1880s, hand-held exposures became possible for the first time because of the introduction of gelatin-silver bromide emulsion plates. This prompted some manufacturers to make cameras disguised as, or in the shape of, everyday objects known as 'detective cameras', designed for taking candid shots without the subject being aware they were being photographed. The Goerz Binocular camera (1908) doubled as opera glasses; Houghton's Ticka camera (1906) looked like a pocket watch; and the best-selling circular waistcoat camera by Stirn (1889) was designed to be concealed inside a waistcoat. The Fallowfield Facile of 1888 was disguised as a wooden box, parcel or case, complete with straps and a carrying handle. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)