Freegans Enjoy Their Meal Made From Rubbish : News Photo

Freegans Enjoy Their Meal Made From Rubbish

Credit: 
Barcroft Media / Contributor
NEW YORK - JULY 20: EXCLUSIVE. Freegan Janet Kalish, 48 posing for a picture with some of the food she's collected form the rubbish on July 20, 2011 in New York City.Thrifty party-goers enjoyed a summer barbecue, with food they'd found in the rubbish. Young professionals from New York are spending their evenings bin-diving to collect food thrown away by cafes and supermarkets as a way of saving money and preventing waste. A group of Freegans, who live by using materials others throw away, organise monthly 'trash tours' to help people find the best places for free food products. The group found vegetables, packaged salads, yogurts, pasta, bread rolls and hummus and met the following day to cook a lavish barbecue, including homemade burgers and grilled vegetables. Organiser Janet Kalish said: 'We are finding these tours to be extremely popular. They are filling up with newcomers who are shocked by the level of waste and who now realise what they can recover from supermarket bins.' (Photo by Laurentiu Garofeanu / Barcroft U / Getty Images)
Caption:
NEW YORK - JULY 20: EXCLUSIVE. Freegan Janet Kalish, 48 posing for a picture with some of the food she's collected form the rubbish on July 20, 2011 in New York City.Thrifty party-goers enjoyed a summer barbecue, with food they'd found in the rubbish. Young professionals from New York are spending their evenings bin-diving to collect food thrown away by cafes and supermarkets as a way of saving money and preventing waste. A group of Freegans, who live by using materials others throw away, organise monthly 'trash tours' to help people find the best places for free food products. The group found vegetables, packaged salads, yogurts, pasta, bread rolls and hummus and met the following day to cook a lavish barbecue, including homemade burgers and grilled vegetables. Organiser Janet Kalish said: 'We are finding these tours to be extremely popular. They are filling up with newcomers who are shocked by the level of waste and who now realise what they can recover from supermarket bins.' (Photo by Laurentiu Garofeanu / Barcroft U / Getty Images)
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Date created:
August 04, 2011
Editorial #:
120306492
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Barcroft Media
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Barcroft Media
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Freegan Janet Kalish 48 posing for a picture with some of the food... News Photo 120306492Bizarre,Enjoyment,Exclusive,Food,Freegan,Garbage,Human Interest,Meal,New York City,Party,People,USA,Vertical,WastePhotographer Collection: Barcroft Media NEW YORK - JULY 20: EXCLUSIVE. Freegan Janet Kalish, 48 posing for a picture with some of the food she's collected form the rubbish on July 20, 2011 in New York City.Thrifty party-goers enjoyed a summer barbecue, with food they'd found in the rubbish. Young professionals from New York are spending their evenings bin-diving to collect food thrown away by cafes and supermarkets as a way of saving money and preventing waste. A group of Freegans, who live by using materials others throw away, organise monthly 'trash tours' to help people find the best places for free food products. The group found vegetables, packaged salads, yogurts, pasta, bread rolls and hummus and met the following day to cook a lavish barbecue, including homemade burgers and grilled vegetables. Organiser Janet Kalish said: 'We are finding these tours to be extremely popular. They are filling up with newcomers who are shocked by the level of waste and who now realise what they can recover from supermarket bins.' (Photo by Laurentiu Garofeanu / Barcroft U / Getty Images)