Traditional Blue Fin Tuna Fishing Off The Coast Of Spain : News Photo

Traditional Blue Fin Tuna Fishing Off The Coast Of Spain

Credit: 
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez / Contributor
BARBATE, SPAIN - JUNE 03: Fishermen get ready to dive and pick up nets from underwater as they prepare to fish bluenfin tunas during the end of the Almadraba tuna fishing season on June 3, 2014 near the Barbate coast, in Cadiz province, Spain. Almadraba is a traditional bluefin tuna fishing method in Southern Spain already used during Phoenician and Romans times. Fishers place mazes of nets to catch tuna migrating from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and select those that have the best size. Almadraba tuna is well demanded by Japanese for its quality. Today fishers use a different technique to control the catch amount by releasing many of the bluefin tunas before hauling the nets to avoid exceeding their limited quota fixed by International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas 'ICCACT'. Almadraba fishers association claim the fishing quota could now be increased as fishers are struggling and the tuna population has recovered quite well. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
Caption:
BARBATE, SPAIN - JUNE 03: Fishermen get ready to dive and pick up nets from underwater as they prepare to fish bluenfin tunas during the end of the Almadraba tuna fishing season on June 3, 2014 near the Barbate coast, in Cadiz province, Spain. Almadraba is a traditional bluefin tuna fishing method in Southern Spain already used during Phoenician and Romans times. Fishers place mazes of nets to catch tuna migrating from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and select those that have the best size. Almadraba tuna is well demanded by Japanese for its quality. Today fishers use a different technique to control the catch amount by releasing many of the bluefin tunas before hauling the nets to avoid exceeding their limited quota fixed by International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas 'ICCACT'. Almadraba fishers association claim the fishing quota could now be increased as fishers are struggling and the tuna population has recovered quite well. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
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Date created:
June 03, 2014
Editorial #:
450259592
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Fishermen get ready to dive and pick up nets from underwater as they... News Photo 450259592Almadraba,Animal,Atlantic Ocean,Barbate,Business,Cadiz,Corporate Business,Diver,Economy,End,Finance,Fish,Fisherman,Fishing,Horizontal,Human Interest,Nets,Pick,Preparation,Province,Season,Shore,Spain,bluenfinPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2014 Pablo Blazquez DominguezBARBATE, SPAIN - JUNE 03: Fishermen get ready to dive and pick up nets from underwater as they prepare to fish bluenfin tunas during the end of the Almadraba tuna fishing season on June 3, 2014 near the Barbate coast, in Cadiz province, Spain. Almadraba is a traditional bluefin tuna fishing method in Southern Spain already used during Phoenician and Romans times. Fishers place mazes of nets to catch tuna migrating from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and select those that have the best size. Almadraba tuna is well demanded by Japanese for its quality. Today fishers use a different technique to control the catch amount by releasing many of the bluefin tunas before hauling the nets to avoid exceeding their limited quota fixed by International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas 'ICCACT'. Almadraba fishers association claim the fishing quota could now be increased as fishers are struggling and the tuna population has recovered quite well. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)