Forensic Evidence Confirms Cannibalism In Jamestown Colony : News Photo

Forensic Evidence Confirms Cannibalism In Jamestown Colony

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 1: A facil reconstruction from the remains of 'Jane', a 17th teenager from Jamestown unveiled today at the Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC on May 1, 2013. Forensic experts believe that after examining the incomplete skull and tibia of the girl, that after her death, she was consumed by colonists there during a rough winter of 1609-1610 wherein 200 colonists died. The find of physical evidence by Jamestown Archeologists reveals startling survival tactics at the historic colony. Smithsonian anthropologists and archeologists believe that chop marks on her skull indicate attempts to split the skull open. Scientists were able to determine that 'Jane', was age 14, from England but they could not determine cause of death. On May 3rd the facial reconstruction will be on display at the museum. The skeletal remains will be on display at Historic Jamestowne near the discovery site on Jamestown Island. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Caption:
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 1: A facil reconstruction from the remains of 'Jane', a 17th teenager from Jamestown unveiled today at the Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC on May 1, 2013. Forensic experts believe that after examining the incomplete skull and tibia of the girl, that after her death, she was consumed by colonists there during a rough winter of 1609-1610 wherein 200 colonists died. The find of physical evidence by Jamestown Archeologists reveals startling survival tactics at the historic colony. Smithsonian anthropologists and archeologists believe that chop marks on her skull indicate attempts to split the skull open. Scientists were able to determine that 'Jane', was age 14, from England but they could not determine cause of death. On May 3rd the facial reconstruction will be on display at the museum. The skeletal remains will be on display at Historic Jamestowne near the discovery site on Jamestown Island. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Date created:
May 01, 2013
Editorial #:
167876917
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The Washington Post / Contributor
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The Washington Post
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The Washington Post
Object name:
cannibal

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facil reconstruction from the remains of 'Jane' a 17th teenager from... News Photo 167876917Human Interest,Jamestown,Natural History Museum,Reconstruction,Remains,Teenager,USA,Vertical,Washington DCPhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2013 The Washington PostWASHINGTON, DC - MAY 1: A facil reconstruction from the remains of 'Jane', a 17th teenager from Jamestown unveiled today at the Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC on May 1, 2013. Forensic experts believe that after examining the incomplete skull and tibia of the girl, that after her death, she was consumed by colonists there during a rough winter of 1609-1610 wherein 200 colonists died. The find of physical evidence by Jamestown Archeologists reveals startling survival tactics at the historic colony. Smithsonian anthropologists and archeologists believe that chop marks on her skull indicate attempts to split the skull open. Scientists were able to determine that 'Jane', was age 14, from England but they could not determine cause of death. On May 3rd the facial reconstruction will be on display at the museum. The skeletal remains will be on display at Historic Jamestowne near the discovery site on Jamestown Island. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)