ROM curatorial staff artifacts : News Photo

ROM curatorial staff artifacts

Credit: 
Lucas Oleniuk / Contributor
TORONTO, ON - MARCH 18: Dr. Henry Choong - My favourite part of the ROM's collections is the Hydrozoa, which is likely the best research collection in existence for shallow-water species, including hydroids from the western North Atlantic and other oceans. Hydroids are predatory organisms, usually colonial, with multiple connected polyps. They belong to the phylum Cnidaria, a group of mostly marine animals that includes corals and jellyfish. This hydroid (Obelia longissima, ROMIZ B4002) originated from Japan and was found in debris from the catastrophic TÅchoku earthquake and tsunami of 2011 that washed ashore in Washington State, USA in 2012. At the ROM, taxonomists Dr. Dale R. Calder and Dr. Henry H.C. Choong conduct research on hydroids collected from the tsunami debris in order to understand the dispersal of marine life and assess the threat of invasive species. Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star (Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Caption:
TORONTO, ON - MARCH 18: Dr. Henry Choong - My favourite part of the ROM's collections is the Hydrozoa, which is likely the best research collection in existence for shallow-water species, including hydroids from the western North Atlantic and other oceans. Hydroids are predatory organisms, usually colonial, with multiple connected polyps. They belong to the phylum Cnidaria, a group of mostly marine animals that includes corals and jellyfish. This hydroid (Obelia longissima, ROMIZ B4002) originated from Japan and was found in debris from the catastrophic TÅchoku earthquake and tsunami of 2011 that washed ashore in Washington State, USA in 2012. At the ROM, taxonomists Dr. Dale R. Calder and Dr. Henry H.C. Choong conduct research on hydroids collected from the tsunami debris in order to understand the dispersal of marine life and assess the threat of invasive species. Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star (Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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Date created:
March 04, 2014
Editorial #:
479521255
Release info:
Not released.More information
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Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Toronto Star
Credit:
Toronto Star via Getty Images
Max file size:
1,709 x 2,638 px (8.55 x 13.19 in) - 200 dpi - 3.19 MB
Source:
Toronto Star
Object name:
LO_hydra

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Dr Henry Choong My favourite part of the ROM's collections is the... News Photo 479521255Archaeology,Arts Culture and Entertainment,Canada,Collection,Computer Chip,Human Interest,Hydra - Polyp Corals,Hydroid,North Atlantic Ocean,Origins,Part Of,Research,Sea,Species,Toronto,VerticalPhotographer Collection: Toronto Star 2014 Toronto StarTORONTO, ON - MARCH 18: Dr. Henry Choong - My favourite part of the ROM's collections is the Hydrozoa, which is likely the best research collection in existence for shallow-water species, including hydroids from the western North Atlantic and other oceans. Hydroids are predatory organisms, usually colonial, with multiple connected polyps. They belong to the phylum Cnidaria, a group of mostly marine animals that includes corals and jellyfish. This hydroid (Obelia longissima, ROMIZ B4002) originated from Japan and was found in debris from the catastrophic TÅchoku earthquake and tsunami of 2011 that washed ashore in Washington State, USA in 2012. At the ROM, taxonomists Dr. Dale R. Calder and Dr. Henry H.C. Choong conduct research on hydroids collected from the tsunami debris in order to understand the dispersal of marine life and assess the threat of invasive species. Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star (Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star via Getty Images)