Villagers Offer Up Gifts To Volcano As Part Of Yadnya Kasada Festival : News Photo

Villagers Offer Up Gifts To Volcano As Part Of Yadnya Kasada Festival

Credit: 
Ulet Ifansasti / Stringer
PROBOLINGGO, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - JULY 24: Doni, holds a chicken result of catch thrown by Hindu worshippers at foot of Mount Bromo during the Yadnya Kasada Festival at crater of Mount Bromo on July 24, 2013 in Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. The festival is the main festival of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. On the fourteenth day, the Tenggerese make the journey to Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. The origin of the festival lies in the 15th century when a princess named Roro Anteng started the principality of Tengger with her husband Joko Seger, and the childless couple asked the mountain Gods for help in bearing children. The legend says the Gods granted them 24 children but on the provision that the 25th must be tossed into the volcano in sacrifice. The 25th child, Kesuma, was finally sacrificed in this way after initial refusal, and the tradition of throwing sacrifices into the caldera to appease the mountain Gods continues today. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
Caption:
PROBOLINGGO, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - JULY 24: Doni, holds a chicken result of catch thrown by Hindu worshippers at foot of Mount Bromo during the Yadnya Kasada Festival at crater of Mount Bromo on July 24, 2013 in Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. The festival is the main festival of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. On the fourteenth day, the Tenggerese make the journey to Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. The origin of the festival lies in the 15th century when a princess named Roro Anteng started the principality of Tengger with her husband Joko Seger, and the childless couple asked the mountain Gods for help in bearing children. The legend says the Gods granted them 24 children but on the provision that the 25th must be tossed into the volcano in sacrifice. The 25th child, Kesuma, was finally sacrificed in this way after initial refusal, and the tradition of throwing sacrifices into the caldera to appease the mountain Gods continues today. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 24, 2013
Editorial #:
174349311
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Doni holds a chicken result of catch thrown by Hindu worshippers at... News Photo 174349311Bromo-Tengger-Semeru National Park,Catch,Chicken,Donieber Alexander Marangon,East Java Province,Feet,Hinduism,Hold,Horizontal,Human Interest,Indonesia,Mt Bromo,Outdoors,Probolinggo,Religion,Result,Sidoarjo,Spirituality,Throwing,Volcanic Crater,Worshipper,Yadnya Kasada FestivalPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2013 Getty ImagesPROBOLINGGO, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - JULY 24: Doni, holds a chicken result of catch thrown by Hindu worshippers at foot of Mount Bromo during the Yadnya Kasada Festival at crater of Mount Bromo on July 24, 2013 in Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. The festival is the main festival of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. On the fourteenth day, the Tenggerese make the journey to Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. The origin of the festival lies in the 15th century when a princess named Roro Anteng started the principality of Tengger with her husband Joko Seger, and the childless couple asked the mountain Gods for help in bearing children. The legend says the Gods granted them 24 children but on the provision that the 25th must be tossed into the volcano in sacrifice. The 25th child, Kesuma, was finally sacrificed in this way after initial refusal, and the tradition of throwing sacrifices into the caldera to appease the mountain Gods continues today. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)