Abandoned Public School Number Four : News Photo

Abandoned Public School Number Four

Credit: Lindsay Gramana / Contributor
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Decrepit public school with Doric columns and boarded windows visible from I-95 in downtown Jacksonville, Florida. The original wooden Riverside Park School was built in 1891. More than twenty years and multiple additions later, Duval County declared it a fire hazard. Public School Number Four was one of several brick school houses built to accomodate the city's growing community. Construction ensued from 1917 to 1918 and cost over $250,000. The school was eventually renamed Annie Lytle Elementary School in honor of a long-time teacher and principal. In the 1950s, the erection of I-95 and I-10 separated it from Riverside Park. Removed from the public, the school ceased operations in 1960. After serving as storage and office space, the former Public School Number Four was condemned in 1971. Since then, it has succumbed to at least one fire, collapse, the homeless, adventurous youth, gangs, paranormal activity, historic landmark designation, and on-again off-again plans for demolition.
Caption:
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Decrepit public school with Doric columns and boarded windows visible from I-95 in downtown Jacksonville, Florida. The original wooden Riverside Park School was built in 1891. More than twenty years and multiple additions later, Duval County declared it a fire hazard. Public School Number Four was one of several brick school houses built to accomodate the city's growing community. Construction ensued from 1917 to 1918 and cost over $250,000. The school was eventually renamed Annie Lytle Elementary School in honor of a long-time teacher and principal. In the 1950s, the erection of I-95 and I-10 separated it from Riverside Park. Removed from the public, the school ceased operations in 1960. After serving as storage and office space, the former Public School Number Four was condemned in 1971. Since then, it has succumbed to at least one fire, collapse, the homeless, adventurous youth, gangs, paranormal activity, historic landmark designation, and on-again off-again plans for demolition.
Calculate priceView cart
Date created:
January 15, 2013
Editorial #:
159673614
Release info:
Not released.More information
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
Moment
Credit:
FlickrVision
Max file size:
3,881 x 2,582 px (53.90 x 35.86 in) - 72 dpi - 3.12 MB
Source:
Moment Editorial
Object name:
5073721958.jpg

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
Decrepit public school with Doric columns and boarded windows visible... News Photo 159673614Abandoned,Column,Doric,Downtown District,Finance,Florida - USA,Gulf Coast States,Horizontal,Jacksonville - Florida,Public,School,USA,WindowPhotographer Collection: Moment © 2013 Lindsay Wiles Gramana[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Decrepit public school with Doric columns and boarded windows visible from I-95 in downtown Jacksonville, Florida. The original wooden Riverside Park School was built in 1891. More than twenty years and multiple additions later, Duval County declared it a fire hazard. Public School Number Four was one of several brick school houses built to accomodate the city's growing community. Construction ensued from 1917 to 1918 and cost over $250,000. The school was eventually renamed Annie Lytle Elementary School in honor of a long-time teacher and principal. In the 1950s, the erection of I-95 and I-10 separated it from Riverside Park. Removed from the public, the school ceased operations in 1960. After serving as storage and office space, the former Public School Number Four was condemned in 1971. Since then, it has succumbed to at least one fire, collapse, the homeless, adventurous youth, gangs, paranormal activity, historic landmark designation, and on-again off-again plans for demolition.