With Rain Due, City Works To Preserve Paper Memorials : News Photo

With Rain Due, City Works To Preserve Paper Memorials

Credit: 
Boston Globe / Contributor
BOSTON - MAY 7: Copley Square - Marta Crilly, of Dorchester, an assistant archivist at Boston's Office of City Clerk Archives and Records Management Division, works carefully to separate hand-written paper signs and mementos from other objects left at the Copley Square Boston Marathon memorial. Workers from the Boston City Archives and Mayor Menino's office culled through the makeshift memorial to the Boston Marathon bombings in Copley Square early on Tuesday morning, May 7, 2013 to remove handwritten signs, posters, notes, and other fragile items so the keepsakes can be preserved. Weather forecasters expect rain on Wednesday and through the rest of the week. City officials want to save the paper items before rain blurs the ink and disintegrates the paper. “We want to get all the paper out of there to ensure the rain doesn’t destroy it,” John McColgan, the Boston City Archivist.” The first step is to ensure that the hardcopy is preserved and it is documented. (Photo by Dina Rudick/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Caption:
BOSTON - MAY 7: Copley Square - Marta Crilly, of Dorchester, an assistant archivist at Boston's Office of City Clerk Archives and Records Management Division, works carefully to separate hand-written paper signs and mementos from other objects left at the Copley Square Boston Marathon memorial. Workers from the Boston City Archives and Mayor Menino's office culled through the makeshift memorial to the Boston Marathon bombings in Copley Square early on Tuesday morning, May 7, 2013 to remove handwritten signs, posters, notes, and other fragile items so the keepsakes can be preserved. Weather forecasters expect rain on Wednesday and through the rest of the week. City officials want to save the paper items before rain blurs the ink and disintegrates the paper. “We want to get all the paper out of there to ensure the rain doesn’t destroy it,” John McColgan, the Boston City Archivist.” The first step is to ensure that the hardcopy is preserved and it is documented. (Photo by Dina Rudick/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
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Date created:
May 07, 2013
Editorial #:
168239501
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Boston Globe
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Boston Globe
Object name:
Rudick_rainmemorial642_met

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Copley Square Marta Crilly of Dorchester an assistant archivist at... News Photo 168239501Assistant,Boston - Massachusetts,Dorchester,Handwriting,Horizontal,Human Interest,Massachusetts,Memorial,Object,Paper,Separation,Sign,USA,WorkingPhotographer Collection: Boston Globe 2013 - The Boston GlobeBOSTON - MAY 7: Copley Square - Marta Crilly, of Dorchester, an assistant archivist at Boston's Office of City Clerk Archives and Records Management Division, works carefully to separate hand-written paper signs and mementos from other objects left at the Copley Square Boston Marathon memorial. Workers from the Boston City Archives and Mayor Menino's office culled through the makeshift memorial to the Boston Marathon bombings in Copley Square early on Tuesday morning, May 7, 2013 to remove handwritten signs, posters, notes, and other fragile items so the keepsakes can be preserved. Weather forecasters expect rain on Wednesday and through the rest of the week. City officials want to save the paper items before rain blurs the ink and disintegrates the paper. “We want to get all the paper out of there to ensure the rain doesn’t destroy it,” John McColgan, the Boston City Archivist.” The first step is to ensure that the hardcopy is preserved and it is documented. (Photo by Dina Rudick/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)