The Page family of Alexandria attaches a Medcottage to their house for grandma instead of sending her to a nursing home. : News Photo

The Page family of Alexandria attaches a Medcottage to their house for grandma instead of sending her to a nursing home.

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The Washington Post / Contributor
ALEXANDRIA, VA - JULY 20: Colorful miniature houses sit on a shelf below the video camera, speaker and climate control units in Viola Baez's med-cottage, the first in Alexandria, VA, on Friday, July 20, 2012. Baez was apprehensive about moving into the one-room addition to her family's Vengo Ct. home, which is outfitted with remote-controlled cameras to monitor her health. The closely knit family decided to install the addition instead of housing Baez in a nursing home. As the weeks went by, Baez settled into the stain-resistant space. She now spends most days curled on a hide-a-bed, with a newspaper and a magnifying glass or in conversation with one of her granddaughters, who come in to watch movies. (Photo by Daniel C. Britt / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Caption:
ALEXANDRIA, VA - JULY 20: Colorful miniature houses sit on a shelf below the video camera, speaker and climate control units in Viola Baez's med-cottage, the first in Alexandria, VA, on Friday, July 20, 2012. Baez was apprehensive about moving into the one-room addition to her family's Vengo Ct. home, which is outfitted with remote-controlled cameras to monitor her health. The closely knit family decided to install the addition instead of housing Baez in a nursing home. As the weeks went by, Baez settled into the stain-resistant space. She now spends most days curled on a hide-a-bed, with a newspaper and a magnifying glass or in conversation with one of her granddaughters, who come in to watch movies. (Photo by Daniel C. Britt / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Date created:
July 21, 2012
Editorial #:
156996712
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The Washington Post
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Colorful miniature houses sit on a shelf below the video camera... News Photo 156996712Alexandria - Virginia,Camera,Climate,Control,Horizontal,House,Human Interest,Measuring,Multi Colored,Shelf,Sitting,Small,Speaker,USA,Unit,VideoPhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2012 The Washington PostALEXANDRIA, VA - JULY 20: Colorful miniature houses sit on a shelf below the video camera, speaker and climate control units in Viola Baez's med-cottage, the first in Alexandria, VA, on Friday, July 20, 2012. Baez was apprehensive about moving into the one-room addition to her family's Vengo Ct. home, which is outfitted with remote-controlled cameras to monitor her health. The closely knit family decided to install the addition instead of housing Baez in a nursing home. As the weeks went by, Baez settled into the stain-resistant space. She now spends most days curled on a hide-a-bed, with a newspaper and a magnifying glass or in conversation with one of her granddaughters, who come in to watch movies. (Photo by Daniel C. Britt / The Washington Post via Getty Images)