Cetywayo, c 1880. : News Photo

Cetywayo, c 1880.

Credit: 
Science & Society Picture Library / Contributor
UNSPECIFIED - SEPTEMBER 03: A carte-de-visite portrait of Cetywayo (c1836-1884), king of the Zulus, taken on board the S.S. Natal by Crewes & Van Laun, Cape Town, South Africa and published by Marion & Co, London in about 1880. A carte-de-visite is a photograph mounted on a piece of card the size of a formal visiting card of the 1850s - hence the name. The format was introduced by the French photographer Andre-Adolphe-Eugene Disderi (1819-1889) in 1854. As well as family portraits, commercial cartes of celebrities such as politicians, royalty and popular personalities were published. The craze for collecting celebrity cartes-de-visite in albums reached its peak during the 1860s but the format remained popular until the beginning of the twentieth century. The backs of cartes-de-visite were normally printed with the photographer's name and address. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Caption:
UNSPECIFIED - SEPTEMBER 03: A carte-de-visite portrait of Cetywayo (c1836-1884), king of the Zulus, taken on board the S.S. Natal by Crewes & Van Laun, Cape Town, South Africa and published by Marion & Co, London in about 1880. A carte-de-visite is a photograph mounted on a piece of card the size of a formal visiting card of the 1850s - hence the name. The format was introduced by the French photographer Andre-Adolphe-Eugene Disderi (1819-1889) in 1854. As well as family portraits, commercial cartes of celebrities such as politicians, royalty and popular personalities were published. The craze for collecting celebrity cartes-de-visite in albums reached its peak during the 1860s but the format remained popular until the beginning of the twentieth century. The backs of cartes-de-visite were normally printed with the photographer's name and address. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
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Date created:
January 01, 1880
Editorial #:
90764533
Release info:
Not released.More information
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
SSPL
Credit:
SSPL via Getty Images
Max file size:
2,658 x 3,508 px (8.86 x 11.69 in) - 300 dpi - 830 KB
Source:
SSPL
Object name:
10435749

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cartedevisite portrait of Cetywayo king of the Zulus taken on board... News Photo 9076453319th Century Style,Adult,Africa,African,Board,Cape Town,Chief,Human Interest,King,Kwazulu-Natal,London,Men,Naked,Passenger,People,Portrait,Publication,Ship,South Africa,South African,Vertical,Victorian Style,Wheel,ZuluPhotographer Collection: SSPL SSPL/National Media MuseumUNSPECIFIED - SEPTEMBER 03: A carte-de-visite portrait of Cetywayo (c1836-1884), king of the Zulus, taken on board the S.S. Natal by Crewes & Van Laun, Cape Town, South Africa and published by Marion & Co, London in about 1880. A carte-de-visite is a photograph mounted on a piece of card the size of a formal visiting card of the 1850s - hence the name. The format was introduced by the French photographer Andre-Adolphe-Eugene Disderi (1819-1889) in 1854. As well as family portraits, commercial cartes of celebrities such as politicians, royalty and popular personalities were published. The craze for collecting celebrity cartes-de-visite in albums reached its peak during the 1860s but the format remained popular until the beginning of the twentieth century. The backs of cartes-de-visite were normally printed with the photographer's name and address. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)