BULGARIA-ISLAM-HISTORY-MINORITIES-COMMUNISM : News Photo

BULGARIA-ISLAM-HISTORY-MINORITIES-COMMUNISM

Credit: 
NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV / Stringer
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY VESSELA SERGUEVA Bulgarian Muslim Ibrahim Byalk shows on August 5, 2012 in the village of Kornitsa, some 200 kms south of Sofia, his arm where a bullet is still lodged 40 years after he was shot at for refusing to change his name to a non-Muslim one. Byalk, 65, belongs to Bulgaria's 200,000-strong Pomak minority, whose Christian Orthodox ancestors were converted to Islam during the Ottoman domination between the 14th and 19th centuries. Under a forceful assimilation policy in the early 1970s however, these people who had lived for generations in Bulgaria and spoke Bulgarian were made to change their Muslim names to Christian ones by the Communist regime. On March 29, 2013, they will mark the 40th anniversary of the brutal repression in the tiny southern village of Kornitsa that silenced the local resistance movement against the policy. AFP PHOTO / NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV (Photo credit should read NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY VESSELA SERGUEVA Bulgarian Muslim Ibrahim Byalk shows on August 5, 2012 in the village of Kornitsa, some 200 kms south of Sofia, his arm where a bullet is still lodged 40 years after he was shot at for refusing to change his name to a non-Muslim one. Byalk, 65, belongs to Bulgaria's 200,000-strong Pomak minority, whose Christian Orthodox ancestors were converted to Islam during the Ottoman domination between the 14th and 19th centuries. Under a forceful assimilation policy in the early 1970s however, these people who had lived for generations in Bulgaria and spoke Bulgarian were made to change their Muslim names to Christian ones by the Communist regime. On March 29, 2013, they will mark the 40th anniversary of the brutal repression in the tiny southern village of Kornitsa that silenced the local resistance movement against the policy. AFP PHOTO / NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV (Photo credit should read NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
March 27, 2013
Editorial #:
164787784
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY VESSELA SERGUEVA
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
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AFP
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3,123 x 2,060 px (43.38 x 28.61 in) - 72 dpi - 2.81 MB
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Source:
AFP
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AFP
Object name:
Par7515986

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Bulgarian Muslim Ibrahim Byalk shows on August 5 2012 in the village... News Photo 164787784Arm,Bulgaria,Bullet,Changing,Horizontal,Identity,Kilometer,Kornitsa,Minority Groups,Refusing,Show,Social Issues,Sofia,Stuck,Village,non-MuslimPhotographer Collection: AFP 2013 AFPTO GO WITH AFP STORY BY VESSELA SERGUEVA Bulgarian Muslim Ibrahim Byalk shows on August 5, 2012 in the village of Kornitsa, some 200 kms south of Sofia, his arm where a bullet is still lodged 40 years after he was shot at for refusing to change his name to a non-Muslim one. Byalk, 65, belongs to Bulgaria's 200,000-strong Pomak minority, whose Christian Orthodox ancestors were converted to Islam during the Ottoman domination between the 14th and 19th centuries. Under a forceful assimilation policy in the early 1970s however, these people who had lived for generations in Bulgaria and spoke Bulgarian were made to change their Muslim names to Christian ones by the Communist regime. On March 29, 2013, they will mark the 40th anniversary of the brutal repression in the tiny southern village of Kornitsa that silenced the local resistance movement against the policy. AFP PHOTO / NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV (Photo credit should read NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV/AFP/Getty Images)