UKRAINE-RUSSIA-POLITICS-UNREST-FAMILY : News Photo

UKRAINE-RUSSIA-POLITICS-UNREST-FAMILY

Credit: 
AFP / Stringer
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY KATHERINE HADDON Brothers Genya (R) and Dima Onoprienko pose for a photograph in their home in Gzhankoy, Crimea, on March 11, 2013. The Onoprienko family is split down the middle on whether Crimea should become part of Russia or stay with Ukraine, reflecting deep divisions between even blood relatives ahead of the March 16 referendum on the region's future. Dima, 17 -- a computing student who loves the Beatles, 'Breaking Bad' and Western sportswear -- and his mother Olga, a kindergarten teacher, are both desperate for Crimea to remain an autonomous region of Ukraine. But Dima's bodybuilding brother Zhenya, 20, and taxi driver father Sasha believe that only closer ties with President Vladimir Putin's Russia can bring Crimea the jobs and stability it desperately needs. AFP PHOTO / KATHERINE HADDON (Photo credit should read KATHERINE HADDON/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY KATHERINE HADDON Brothers Genya (R) and Dima Onoprienko pose for a photograph in their home in Gzhankoy, Crimea, on March 11, 2013. The Onoprienko family is split down the middle on whether Crimea should become part of Russia or stay with Ukraine, reflecting deep divisions between even blood relatives ahead of the March 16 referendum on the region's future. Dima, 17 -- a computing student who loves the Beatles, 'Breaking Bad' and Western sportswear -- and his mother Olga, a kindergarten teacher, are both desperate for Crimea to remain an autonomous region of Ukraine. But Dima's bodybuilding brother Zhenya, 20, and taxi driver father Sasha believe that only closer ties with President Vladimir Putin's Russia can bring Crimea the jobs and stability it desperately needs. AFP PHOTO / KATHERINE HADDON (Photo credit should read KATHERINE HADDON/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
March 11, 2014
Editorial #:
478390319
Release info:
Not released.More information
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Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY KATHERINE HADDON
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Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
AFP
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AFP/Getty Images
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6,000 x 4,000 px (83.33 x 55.56 in) - 72 dpi - 3.14 MB
Source:
AFP
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AFP
Object name:
Par7819998

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Brothers Genya and Dima Onoprienko pose for a photograph in their... News Photo 4783903192014 Russian Military Intervention in Ukraine,Conflict,Crimea,Crisis,Home,Horizontal,Photograph,Portrait,UkrainePhotographer Collection: AFP 2014 AFPTO GO WITH AFP STORY BY KATHERINE HADDON Brothers Genya (R) and Dima Onoprienko pose for a photograph in their home in Gzhankoy, Crimea, on March 11, 2013. The Onoprienko family is split down the middle on whether Crimea should become part of Russia or stay with Ukraine, reflecting deep divisions between even blood relatives ahead of the March 16 referendum on the region's future. Dima, 17 -- a computing student who loves the Beatles, 'Breaking Bad' and Western sportswear -- and his mother Olga, a kindergarten teacher, are both desperate for Crimea to remain an autonomous region of Ukraine. But Dima's bodybuilding brother Zhenya, 20, and taxi driver father Sasha believe that only closer ties with President Vladimir Putin's Russia can bring Crimea the jobs and stability it desperately needs. AFP PHOTO / KATHERINE HADDON (Photo credit should read KATHERINE HADDON/AFP/Getty Images)